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POST-GAZETTE, JANUARY 4, "20"13" Page POST-GAZETTE Pamela Donnaruma, Publisher and Editor 5 Prince Street, P.O. Box 130135, Boston, MA 02113 617-227-8929 617-227-8928 FAX 617-227-5307 e-mail: postgazette@aol.com Website: www.BostonPostGazette.com Subscriptions in the United States $30.00 yearly Published weekly by Post-Gazette, 5 Prince St., P.O. Box 130135, Boston, MA 021 i 3 USPS 1538 - Second-Class Postage paid at Boston, MA POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the POST-GAZE'ITE - P.O. Box 130135, Boston, MA 02113 James V. Donnaruma Caesar L. Donnaruma Phyllis F. Donnantma 1896 to 1953 1953 to 1971 1971 to 1990 Vol. 117 - No. 1 Friday, January 4, 2013 OUR POLICY: To help preserve the ideals and sacred traditions of this our adopted country the United States of America: To revere its laws and inspire others to respect and obey them: To strive unceasingly to quicken the public's sense of civic duty: In all ways to aid in making this country greater and better than we found it. What a Difference a Year Makes by Bennett Molinari and Richard Molinari As we approach the New Year with so many people still out of work and the economy still limping along, we would like to share a suc- cess story, proof that good things still happen to good people. We all know the old saying, "It is always darkest before the dawn." it could not be more appropriate to describe the plight and even- tual success that came to our friend Betty. It was nearly three years ago at Christmas that Betty was told that her r division was being transferred and she was to be iaid'off. She had workedf0r a tlocal invest- ment firth for nearly ten years atld could not believe what Was happening to her. Betty lives alone; her job not only provided her with finan- cial security but with a sense of family with her fel- low workers, all this was to be taken away with the loss of her job. Over the next two years Betty sent out dozens of resumes and was only able to secure one interview, she was one among dozens apply- ing for the job and never received a call back. Betty never lost confidence in her- self and despite the precari- ous financial position she was in remained cheerful and positive about her future, but always, coloring each day, was the cloud of finan- cial uncertainty that hung over her head. Last December, with just two weeks of unemployment left, Betty received the tele- phone call she had hoped for, she had sent her resume to a large in-vestment com- pany, her qualifications were exactly what they were looking for and after a suc- cessful interview, only her second in two years, she was telephoned to be informed that she got the job and should report to work in a week. A year has gone by since Betty got that call, she loves her work and is doing a "bang up job" for her employer, they love her performance and Betty has already received a promotion. This Christmas we had dinner with Betty at a fine restaurant. The atmo- sphere was totally different from last year, the threat of being without funds was completely gone and with it the sense of fear and ap- prehension. We exchanged gifts, opening them at the table, we gave Betty a first edition book she was hoping to add to her collection and Betty gave us a box set of our favorite English detective series. Betty spoke of her vacation plans for the summer and of a quick trip to Washington she planned to take just af- ter Christmas. A good job had made an enormous differ- ence in her life as it does for each of us. Betty is a fine example that even in un- certain times, with persis- tence comes success and good things still happen to good people. Wishing all a blessed, healthy and pros- perous New Year. LETTERS POLICY The Post-Gazette invites its readers to submit Letters to the Editor. Letters should be typed, double-spaced and must include the writer's name, address and telephone number. Anonymous letters are not accepted for publication, Due to space considerations, we request that letters not exceed two double-spaced, type-written pages. This newspaper reserves the right to edit letters for style, grammar and taste and to limit the number of letters published from any one person or organization. Deadline for submission is 12:00 noon on the Monday prior to the Friday on which the writer wishes to have the material published. Submission by the deadline does not guarantee publication. Send letter to: Pamela Donnaruma, Editor, The Post-Gazette, P.O. Box 130135, Boston, MA 02113 L'Anno Bello: A Year in Italian Folklore Of Witches and King Cakes .... ':"" :' by Ally January tends to be a divisive month, sym- bolizing rebirth to some and malaise for many. Those who dislike it point to the month's long, unbroken stretch of monotony. The tinsel and Christmas tree ' ornaments journey once more into cardboard boxes stored in attics or basements, slumbering until next year. Snowstorms often interrupt the bitterly cold weather. People retflrn to work or school after the holiday vacation and the general dreariness of the weather makes these days seem eternal. However, January can be a real gem of a month, full of promise for the New Year and even filled with glimpses of the upcoming spring. The reprisal of the daily routine can bring much needed comfort and discipline to our lives -- after all, if the holiday season lasted all Di Censo by the haunting song my grandmother chanted about La Befana: "La Befana vien di notte/Con le scarpe tutte rotte/Col vestito a la romana/Viva, viva La Befana! (La Befana comes at night/with her shoes all broken/ with her Roman-style dress/Long live La BefanaI)" However, I now love the tradition of La Befana because of its antiquity and its embodiment of winter 'and the end of th'e holidays in general. The figure of La Befana may very well have origins in pagan god- desses who symbolized the turning of a New Year and the winter season. I appreciate the fact that Italians didn't sugarcoat La Befana's appearance but left her as a rustic depic- tion of magic and feminine power. La Befana also comprises a nice addition to the rest of Italy's Epiphany customS. An Italian saying year long, it would lose its sense of unique- dictates that "L'Epifan fufte lefete le porta ' ness and expectation. Lucky for us, though, v/a" -- meaning that Eiaiihany endg the holi= January knows that too much discipltne' Ts"dayseason that preceded it. While Epiphany boring, so it ends the Christmas"festivities does mark the end of the Christmas sea- on a high note. Epiphany, which falls on January 6 th and serves as the last of the Twelve Days of Christmas, is much beloved by Italians and encapsulates much of what is great about January. In Italy, Epiphany remains synonymous with La Befana, the principal gift-bringer of the season. Though many Italian children now receive presents on Christmas Eve from Santa Claus, or Babbo Natale, they still wait with anticipation for the coming of La Befana on the night of January 5 th. La Befana is depicted as an old woman, an ambiguous witch or fairy figure, riding a broom and dressed in peasant clothing. Often, a dust- ing of soot covers her from when she enters houses through the chimney. She awards treats to good children but doles out lumps of coal to those who have misbehaved. The Italian Epiphany celebrates the visit of the Three Kings to Jesus, so a legend arose to explain La Befana's connection to this Biblical event. According to this story,, .the Three Kings-Were on the way to visit BaS Jesus when they stopped by La Befantfs house and asked if she would like to accom- pany them. La Befana said that she was too busy sweeping, but later changed her mind, hopped on her broom, and set out to find the Three Kings and Jesus. She never could locate them, but still travels the world on her broom to this day, searching for Baby Jesus and leaving presents for children dur- ing her journey. Today, Christmas markets around Italy remain open until January 6 th, when they are filled with La Befana figu- rines and rock candy representing coal. While La Befana decorations adorn the home, statues of the Three Kings are placed in Italian Nativity scenes on this day, hon- oring their visit to the Holy Family. When I was little, La Befana used to scare me. Her witch-like nature and sneaky noc- turnal activities seemed at odds with the jolly, rotund Santa Clauses and smiling elves that lined American storefronts. This feeling of apprehension was exacerbated son, however, it also signals the beginning of the Carnival period, which ends on Mardi Gras. In Italy and elsewhere, people begin making King Cakes, or round cakes shaped to resemble the crowns of the Wise Men, on this day and continue baking them throughout Carnival. There are many ver- sions of King Cakes, from the almond-filled puff pastries in France to the candied-fruft encrusted :gakes Jn SiJaiiii bh'h' fa/;ori{ version iS the Louisi///: K{rg: Ciaewhicti I make every Epiphany. It is a spiced ring cake stuffed with a cinnamon-sugar filling and decorated with purple, green, and yellow sprinkles. This bright cake reminds me not only of crowns but the spring sun, and has become as much of an Epiphany symbol to me as La Befana. January may not have the best reputa- tion, but it begins with one'bf my all-time favorite holidays, a feast tb, at {s full of tradi- tions, whimsy and lore. Epiphany," which marks t,h T!]re;e. Kinl!s' .iit.,t.o ;e.inr Jesus and wrap :Up,th-TCh .r-.h, lash holds a special place in Italian culture. La Befana provides an indelible and dis- tinctive image of the winter season, a weathered fairy-witch with magical proper- ties who endures the elements in order to surprise children. Epiphany also reminds us that though Christmas is over, fun doesn't have to end. This is the start of Carnival, of bright colors and happy-go-lucky festivities, of King Cakes that shine as brightly as the sun. Precisely because January is so wintry, we need holidays like Epiphany to remind US to always let laughter and aban- don into our homes. Ancient witches and colorful pastries are only the most quirky ways to carry us over to the quickly- approaching springtime. Ally Di Censo is a Graduate Student in His- tory at the University of Massachusetts Bos- ton. She appreciates any comments and sug- gestions about Italian holidays and folklore at adicenso89@gmail.com. NEAD Family Dinner/Family Talk The next North End Against Drugs Family Dinner/Family Talk will be on Monday Janu- ary 7 th at 5:30 pm at the Nazzaro Center. All North End residents are welcome to attend. However, this is a family event so it is for parents/grandparents with_ children, they can bring aunts and uncles with them as well. Teens over 15 can come on their own but we really would like to have their par- ents with them. Nazzaro Center members are most welcome as well. Please RSVP to John Romano by email at jromano45@gmail.com by January 4 th so we can have a count for the food. N.E.A.D. TO HOLD VIGIL FOR SANDY HOOK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL VICTIMS All are welcome and encouraged to attend a Candlelight Vigil for the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Con- necticut at 6:00 pm on Saturday, January 5, 2013 in the North End at the Nazzaro Community Center, 30 N. Bennet Street. The vigil, coordinated by North End Against Drugs (NEAD), will be held outside around the tree in the playground in front of the Nazzaro Center and will include many community groups and participants. The North End Music & Performing Arts Center (NEMPAC) will perform a musical tribute at the vigil. The North Bennet Street School has hand crafted angels for the event. Journals, donated by Roseann Romano will be available for those who wish to write a message, Roseann and Rosina will be delivering the journals to Newtown, Connecti- cut. The Atlantic Avenue Starbucks is supplying hot chocolate and 1-800-Flowers on Hanover Street will be donating carnations. For more information contact Rosina at (rofabs@gmail.com) with any questions. POST-GAZETTE, JANUARY 4, "20"13" Page POST-GAZETTE Pamela Donnaruma, Publisher and Editor 5 Prince Street, P.O. Box 130135, Boston, MA 02113 617-227-8929 617-227-8928 FAX 617-227-5307 e-mail: postgazette@aol.com Website: www.BostonPostGazette.com Subscriptions in the United States $30.00 yearly Published weekly by Post-Gazette, 5 Prince St., P.O. Box 130135, Boston, MA 021 i 3 USPS 1538 - Second-Class Postage paid at Boston, MA POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the POST-GAZE'ITE - P.O. Box 130135, Boston, MA 02113 James V. Donnaruma Caesar L. Donnaruma Phyllis F. Donnantma 1896 to 1953 1953 to 1971 1971 to 1990 Vol. 117 - No. 1 Friday, January 4, 2013 OUR POLICY: To help preserve the ideals and sacred traditions of this our adopted country the United States of America: To revere its laws and inspire others to respect and obey them: To strive unceasingly to quicken the public's sense of civic duty: In all ways to aid in making this country greater and better than we found it. What a Difference a Year Makes by Bennett Molinari and Richard Molinari As we approach the New Year with so many people still out of work and the economy still limping along, we would like to share a suc- cess story, proof that good things still happen to good people. We all know the old saying, "It is always darkest before the dawn." it could not be more appropriate to describe the plight and even- tual success that came to our friend Betty. It was nearly three years ago at Christmas that Betty was told that her r division was being transferred and she was to be iaid'off. She had workedf0r a tlocal invest- ment firth for nearly ten years atld could not believe what Was happening to her. Betty lives alone; her job not only provided her with finan- cial security but with a sense of family with her fel- low workers, all this was to be taken away with the loss of her job. Over the next two years Betty sent out dozens of resumes and was only able to secure one interview, she was one among dozens apply- ing for the job and never received a call back. Betty never lost confidence in her- self and despite the precari- ous financial position she was in remained cheerful and positive about her future, but always, coloring each day, was the cloud of finan- cial uncertainty that hung over her head. Last December, with just two weeks of unemployment left, Betty received the tele- phone call she had hoped for, she had sent her resume to a large in-vestment com- pany, her qualifications were exactly what they were looking for and after a suc- cessful interview, only her second in two years, she was telephoned to be informed that she got the job and should report to work in a week. A year has gone by since Betty got that call, she loves her work and is doing a "bang up job" for her employer, they love her performance and Betty has already received a promotion. This Christmas we had dinner with Betty at a fine restaurant. The atmo- sphere was totally different from last year, the threat of being without funds was completely gone and with it the sense of fear and ap- prehension. We exchanged gifts, opening them at the table, we gave Betty a first edition book she was hoping to add to her collection and Betty gave us a box set of our favorite English detective series. Betty spoke of her vacation plans for the summer and of a quick trip to Washington she planned to take just af- ter Christmas. A good job had made an enormous differ- ence in her life as it does for each of us. Betty is a fine example that even in un- certain times, with persis- tence comes success and good things still happen to good people. Wishing all a blessed, healthy and pros- perous New Year. LETTERS POLICY The Post-Gazette invites its readers to submit Letters to the Editor. Letters should be typed, double-spaced and must include the writer's name, address and telephone number. Anonymous letters are not accepted for publication, Due to space considerations, we request that letters not exceed two double-spaced, type-written pages. This newspaper reserves the right to edit letters for style, grammar and taste and to limit the number of letters published from any one person or organization. Deadline for submission is 12:00 noon on the Monday prior to the Friday on which the writer wishes to have the material published. Submission by the deadline does not guarantee publication. Send letter to: Pamela Donnaruma, Editor, The Post-Gazette, P.O. Box 130135, Boston, MA 02113 L'Anno Bello: A Year in Italian Folklore Of Witches and King Cakes .... ':"" :' by Ally January tends to be a divisive month, sym- bolizing rebirth to some and malaise for many. Those who dislike it point to the month's long, unbroken stretch of monotony. The tinsel and Christmas tree ' ornaments journey once more into cardboard boxes stored in attics or basements, slumbering until next year. Snowstorms often interrupt the bitterly cold weather. People retflrn to work or school after the holiday vacation and the general dreariness of the weather makes these days seem eternal. However, January can be a real gem of a month, full of promise for the New Year and even filled with glimpses of the upcoming spring. The reprisal of the daily routine can bring much needed comfort and discipline to our lives -- after all, if the holiday season lasted all Di Censo by the haunting song my grandmother chanted about La Befana: "La Befana vien di notte/Con le scarpe tutte rotte/Col vestito a la romana/Viva, viva La Befana! (La Befana comes at night/with her shoes all broken/ with her Roman-style dress/Long live La BefanaI)" However, I now love the tradition of La Befana because of its antiquity and its embodiment of winter 'and the end of th'e holidays in general. The figure of La Befana may very well have origins in pagan god- desses who symbolized the turning of a New Year and the winter season. I appreciate the fact that Italians didn't sugarcoat La Befana's appearance but left her as a rustic depic- tion of magic and feminine power. La Befana also comprises a nice addition to the rest of Italy's Epiphany customS. An Italian saying year long, it would lose its sense of unique- dictates that "L'Epifan fufte lefete le porta ' ness and expectation. Lucky for us, though, v/a" -- meaning that Eiaiihany endg the holi= January knows that too much discipltne' Ts"dayseason that preceded it. While Epiphany boring, so it ends the Christmas"festivities does mark the end of the Christmas sea- on a high note. Epiphany, which falls on January 6 th and serves as the last of the Twelve Days of Christmas, is much beloved by Italians and encapsulates much of what is great about January. In Italy, Epiphany remains synonymous with La Befana, the principal gift-bringer of the season. Though many Italian children now receive presents on Christmas Eve from Santa Claus, or Babbo Natale, they still wait with anticipation for the coming of La Befana on the night of January 5 th. La Befana is depicted as an old woman, an ambiguous witch or fairy figure, riding a broom and dressed in peasant clothing. Often, a dust- ing of soot covers her from when she enters houses through the chimney. She awards treats to good children but doles out lumps of coal to those who have misbehaved. The Italian Epiphany celebrates the visit of the Three Kings to Jesus, so a legend arose to explain La Befana's connection to this Biblical event. According to this story,, .the Three Kings-Were on the way to visit BaS Jesus when they stopped by La Befantfs house and asked if she would like to accom- pany them. La Befana said that she was too busy sweeping, but later changed her mind, hopped on her broom, and set out to find the Three Kings and Jesus. She never could locate them, but still travels the world on her broom to this day, searching for Baby Jesus and leaving presents for children dur- ing her journey. Today, Christmas markets around Italy remain open until January 6 th, when they are filled with La Befana figu- rines and rock candy representing coal. While La Befana decorations adorn the home, statues of the Three Kings are placed in Italian Nativity scenes on this day, hon- oring their visit to the Holy Family. When I was little, La Befana used to scare me. Her witch-like nature and sneaky noc- turnal activities seemed at odds with the jolly, rotund Santa Clauses and smiling elves that lined American storefronts. This feeling of apprehension was exacerbated son, however, it also signals the beginning of the Carnival period, which ends on Mardi Gras. In Italy and elsewhere, people begin making King Cakes, or round cakes shaped to resemble the crowns of the Wise Men, on this day and continue baking them throughout Carnival. There are many ver- sions of King Cakes, from the almond-filled puff pastries in France to the candied-fruft encrusted :gakes Jn SiJaiiii bh'h' fa/;ori{ version iS the Louisi///: K{rg: Ciaewhicti I make every Epiphany. It is a spiced ring cake stuffed with a cinnamon-sugar filling and decorated with purple, green, and yellow sprinkles. This bright cake reminds me not only of crowns but the spring sun, and has become as much of an Epiphany symbol to me as La Befana. January may not have the best reputa- tion, but it begins with one'bf my all-time favorite holidays, a feast tb, at {s full of tradi- tions, whimsy and lore. Epiphany," which marks t,h T!]re;e. Kinl!s' .iit.,t.o ;e.inr Jesus and wrap :Up,th-TCh .r-.h, lash holds a special place in Italian culture. La Befana provides an indelible and dis- tinctive image of the winter season, a weathered fairy-witch with magical proper- ties who endures the elements in order to surprise children. Epiphany also reminds us that though Christmas is over, fun doesn't have to end. This is the start of Carnival, of bright colors and happy-go-lucky festivities, of King Cakes that shine as brightly as the sun. Precisely because January is so wintry, we need holidays like Epiphany to remind US to always let laughter and aban- don into our homes. Ancient witches and colorful pastries are only the most quirky ways to carry us over to the quickly- approaching springtime. Ally Di Censo is a Graduate Student in His- tory at the University of Massachusetts Bos- ton. She appreciates any comments and sug- gestions about Italian holidays and folklore at adicenso89@gmail.com. NEAD Family Dinner/Family Talk The next North End Against Drugs Family Dinner/Family Talk will be on Monday Janu- ary 7 th at 5:30 pm at the Nazzaro Center. All North End residents are welcome to attend. However, this is a family event so it is for parents/grandparents with_ children, they can bring aunts and uncles with them as well. Teens over 15 can come on their own but we really would like to have their par- ents with them. Nazzaro Center members are most welcome as well. Please RSVP to John Romano by email at jromano45@gmail.com by January 4 th so we can have a count for the food. N.E.A.D. TO HOLD VIGIL FOR SANDY HOOK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL VICTIMS All are welcome and encouraged to attend a Candlelight Vigil for the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Con- necticut at 6:00 pm on Saturday, January 5, 2013 in the North End at the Nazzaro Community Center, 30 N. Bennet Street. The vigil, coordinated by North End Against Drugs (NEAD), will be held outside around the tree in the playground in front of the Nazzaro Center and will include many community groups and participants. The North End Music & Performing Arts Center (NEMPAC) will perform a musical tribute at the vigil. The North Bennet Street School has hand crafted angels for the event. Journals, donated by Roseann Romano will be available for those who wish to write a message, Roseann and Rosina will be delivering the journals to Newtown, Connecti- cut. The Atlantic Avenue Starbucks is supplying hot chocolate and 1-800-Flowers on Hanover Street will be donating carnations. For more information contact Rosina at (rofabs@gmail.com) with any questions.