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POST-GAZETTE, JANUARY 4, 2013 Page 9 Ray Barron's 11 O'CLOCK NEWS Will Hilllary run in 20167 There can be no doubt it, said David Remnick in NewYorker.com. "Hillary Clinton is running for president." With the path to the 2016 Democratic nomination wide open, Clinton's approval numbers are through the roof and she's already in "high political gear." At a Washington conference on the Middle East, the soon-to-be ex-secretary of state addressed an adoring crowd of dignitaries who swooned over a slickly produced video about Hillary's achievements. It all felt like "an interna- tional endorsement four years in advance of the Iowa Caucus and the New Hampshire Primary." Don't crown Hillary yet, said Jim Geraghty in NationalReview.com. She will be 69 years old on Election Day 2016, and if elected, she'd be the second-01dest president after Ronald Reagan. Hillary has legions of arhairers and a huge fundraising machine. So the question becomes whether she wants it or not. Hillary is, at heart, a quietly optimistic Methodist who believes that government can advance human progress." As president, she would have unparalleled power to promote her goals and her vision. How could she possible resist? So said Stephanie McCrummen in The Washington Post. Like we have repeatedly said, "Women are better managers than men." Go for it Hillary! She will be a great manager of our nationt Remember, many of us are alive today because of our mothers who were good man- agers of our lives. They managed to keep us healthy, well fed, educated us and they were their when we had a boo boo. Enough said. Women now make up a third of all the law- yers and doctors in the U.S. In 1970, women represented only 9.7 percent of the nation's doctors and less than 4.9 percent of its lawyers. . A fathead! A beefy Brazilian inmate's attempt to escape prison was foiled when his stomach got stuck. A smaller convict had just squeezed through a hole in the prison wall when a much larger inmate tried to follow him. He made it through halfway. "The other prisoner tried to push him, but he stayed stuck in the wall," said Lt. Tiago Costa, of the local fire brigade. "He started screaming in pain and that was when the prison guards were alerted." Firefighters cut the inmate loose and he was sent back to his cell. Citrulo! A suspected burglar called 911 to complain that the owner of the Texas home he'd broken into was holding him at gun- point. The suspect, Christopher Moore, placed the emergency call after he allegedly burglarized the home and found the home- owner and his son pointing guns at him. "I'm out in the country somewhere;" Moore told the 911 operator. "Some guy's got a gun on me." The homeowner's wife told the 911 operator, "You better come quick or my husband's going to shoot him." Police arrived and saved Moore from being shot, but charged him with burglary. Amazing! More than 20 million Americans -- 8.7 percent of all adults -- now practice yoga, according to a new study by Yoga dour- nal. Including the cost of classes, clothes, equipment and other accessories, they spend 810.3 billion a year on their practice. The astute Lisa Cappuccio, says, "The ex- ercise that wears most people out is run- ning out of cash." And Bella Culo of Chest- nut Hill claims the best exercise today is hunting for bargains. Too much running backfires! Running too far too fast, especially in middle age, may take years off your life instead of improving your health. A new review of research shows that while regular runners lower their risk of early death by nearly 20 percent compared with non-runners, running more than 20 miles a week can actually be harmful and lead to cardiac damage. Running too fast -- at a pace faster than eight minutes a mile -- also seems to stress the heart. "After age 50, pushing too hard is probably not good for one's heart or longevity," James O'Keefe, a sports cardiologist at Saint Luke's Mid- America Heart Institute in Kansas City, MO, tells The Wall Street Jour- nal. A grow- ing body of O O O research  shows that extreme exercise can harden the coronary artery, a condition typically seen in people who are completely sedentary. Endurance athletes -- such as marathoners and tri- athletes -- also appear to be at higher risk of atrial fibrillation, a heart arrhythmia responsible for one in three strokes. Huh? Chemicals used to purify tap water may be causing food-allergy rates to sky- rocket in the U.S., a new study suggests. Researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine tested the urine of more than 2,0,00 people for dichlorophenols, chemicals found i1chlorine-treated tap water and in pesticides used on many fruits and veg- etables. They found that people with the highest levels of dichlorophenols in their bodies were 80 percent more likely to have food allergies -- most commonly to eggs, milk, peanuts, wheat, soy and shellfish -- than those with the lowest levels. Over the past 15 years, food-allergy rates have in- creased nearly 20 percent in the U.S., more than 3 million children younger than 18 have allergies with reactions that range from mild to deadly. "While the study does not allow concluding that pesticides are re- sponsible for the allergies, it certainly raises the possibility," Kenneth Spaeth, an expert on environmental pollutants at North Shore University Hospital on Long island, NY, tells ABCNews.com. Researchers think that Americans' increased exposure to dichlorophenols may be killing off healthy bacteria in the gut that help the immune system function properly, causing it to at- tack otherwise harmless proteins in food. A wee bit of Italian American history. Filippo Mazzei, a Tuscan physician, fought alongside Thomas Jefferson and Patrick Henry during the American Revolution. Mazzei drew up a plan to capture the British in New York by cutting off their sea escape and convinced France to help the Ameri- can colonists financially and militarily in their struggle against British rule. He also inspired the Jeffersonian phrase: "All men are created equal" when he wrote "All men are by nature equally free and independent." Mr. Peanut and the Planters Peanut Com- pany were created by Italian immigrants Amedeo Obici and Maria Peruzzi in 1887 in Pennsylvania. By 1930, the partners had four huge factories and raked in over $12 million annually. Obici was called "The Pea- nut King." And Mr. Coffee, the best-selling coffee maker in the world, was invented by Vince Marotta, who also invented the paper coffee filter and developed a better way to extract oil from coffee beans. Since 1972, more than 50 million Mr. Coffees have been sold. An estimated I0 billion Mr. Coffee paper filters are sold annually. Our distinguished musicologist Albert Natale with some interesting show business stuff. The producer of all but one of the first 17 James Bond movies was Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli. Broccoli launched the 007 film se- ries in 1962 with "Dr. No." His last film was "Golden Eye" in 1995. His ancestors devel- oped and named the popular vegetable broc- coli in Italy in the 19  century. A Chorus Line, one of Broadway longest running shows, was choreographed by the late Michael Bennett (born Michael DeFiglia), who received a Tony for his work. The late jazz pianist Dave Brubeck began playing with local bands when he was only 13 years old. His biggest hit: "Take Five." "You're Sensational" was one of the final ballads written by composer Cole Porter. Frank Sinatra sang it to Grace Kelly in the 1956 classic "High Society." And actress/singer Julie Andrews was a radio star in the late 1940s to the '50s on a pro- gram called "Educating Archie," in which she starred with ventriloquist Peter Brough. Wish to thank those of you who sent me Christmas cards. And thanks to Giuseppina, cosce storte, for the Baccala. AMERICA IS l BEAUTIFUL ITALIAN NAME Recipes from the Homeland by Vita Orlando Sinopoli COPYRIGHT, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED EGGPLANT PARMIGIANA 1 medium-size eggplant 2 cups prepared bread crumbs 2 beaten eggs 8 ounces shredded mozzarella cheese 1/4 cup Remand or Parmesan grated cheese 1 cup canola oil for frying Salt 8 ounces tomato sauce Peel dark skin off eggplant with paring knife or potato peeler. Slice eggplant into one-quarter-inch rounds. Layer slices on a fiat dish and salt lightly. Beads of liquid will appear on the slices as they rest one on top of the other. Cover eggplant with wax or plastic paper and place in the refrigerator for at least a half-hour. Meanwhile, warm up an eight-ounce can of prepared tomato sauce. FOR FRYING: With paper towels, wipe beads of liquid from each eggplant slice before dipping into beaten egg. Then coat with bread crumbs and set aside in a platter. Heat A cup of oil in a skillet. Place slices in heated oil and fry until brown on both sides. Place slices on paper towels to absorb the oil. Then set aside on a clean platter. Because eggplant slices absorb oil as they fry, additional oil may be needed in the skillet. FOR BAKING: Coat bottom of baking dish with some tomato sauce. Place one layer of eggplant slices over tomato sauce. Spread additional sauce over the eggplant, and sprinkle mozzarella cheese over sauce. Sprinkle some Remand or Parmesan cheese over the mozzarella (optiol). Continue layering the eggplant in that manner. Then pla(e the baking dish into the preheated 350F oven to bake for 25 to 30 minutes. Check occasionally to see that the top layer does not burn. Remove from oven when cheese has melted. Can be served hot or cooled. Remaining Eggplant Parmigiana must be refrigerated. NOTE: Eggplant Parmigiana can be served on a dinner plate together with linguine or spaghetti. This parmigiana became a favorite lunch in our home when served to us between two slices of Papa's Italian sliced bread. # RISTORANTE & BAR Traditional Italian Cuisine 415 Hanover Street, Boston 617.367.2353 11 MountVernon Street, Winchester 781.729.0515 PPivate Function i00ooms any Occasion Chpisleninq Show+00 BoI00, Show+00 BMMoq Etc. Donato Frattaroli donato @ luciaboston.com www.luciaristorante.com \\;/ITA'ORLANDO SINOPt)LI 1st Generation Italian-American Vita Orlando Sinopoli Shares with us a delightful recollection of her memories as a child growing up in Boston's "'Little Italy" and a collection of Italian family recipes from the homeland. Great as Gifts FROM MY BAKERY PERCH available on AMAZON.COM and in local bookstores -- ask for Hard cover #1-4010-9805-3 ISBN Soft Cover #1-4010-9804-5 ISBN POST-GAZETTE, JANUARY 4, 2013 Page 9 Ray Barron's 11 O'CLOCK NEWS Will Hilllary run in 20167 There can be no doubt it, said David Remnick in NewYorker.com. "Hillary Clinton is running for president." With the path to the 2016 Democratic nomination wide open, Clinton's approval numbers are through the roof and she's already in "high political gear." At a Washington conference on the Middle East, the soon-to-be ex-secretary of state addressed an adoring crowd of dignitaries who swooned over a slickly produced video about Hillary's achievements. It all felt like "an interna- tional endorsement four years in advance of the Iowa Caucus and the New Hampshire Primary." Don't crown Hillary yet, said Jim Geraghty in NationalReview.com. She will be 69 years old on Election Day 2016, and if elected, she'd be the second-01dest president after Ronald Reagan. Hillary has legions of arhairers and a huge fundraising machine. So the question becomes whether she wants it or not. Hillary is, at heart, a quietly optimistic Methodist who believes that government can advance human progress." As president, she would have unparalleled power to promote her goals and her vision. How could she possible resist? So said Stephanie McCrummen in The Washington Post. Like we have repeatedly said, "Women are better managers than men." Go for it Hillary! She will be a great manager of our nationt Remember, many of us are alive today because of our mothers who were good man- agers of our lives. They managed to keep us healthy, well fed, educated us and they were their when we had a boo boo. Enough said. Women now make up a third of all the law- yers and doctors in the U.S. In 1970, women represented only 9.7 percent of the nation's doctors and less than 4.9 percent of its lawyers. . A fathead! A beefy Brazilian inmate's attempt to escape prison was foiled when his stomach got stuck. A smaller convict had just squeezed through a hole in the prison wall when a much larger inmate tried to follow him. He made it through halfway. "The other prisoner tried to push him, but he stayed stuck in the wall," said Lt. Tiago Costa, of the local fire brigade. "He started screaming in pain and that was when the prison guards were alerted." Firefighters cut the inmate loose and he was sent back to his cell. Citrulo! A suspected burglar called 911 to complain that the owner of the Texas home he'd broken into was holding him at gun- point. The suspect, Christopher Moore, placed the emergency call after he allegedly burglarized the home and found the home- owner and his son pointing guns at him. "I'm out in the country somewhere;" Moore told the 911 operator. "Some guy's got a gun on me." The homeowner's wife told the 911 operator, "You better come quick or my husband's going to shoot him." Police arrived and saved Moore from being shot, but charged him with burglary. Amazing! More than 20 million Americans -- 8.7 percent of all adults -- now practice yoga, according to a new study by Yoga dour- nal. Including the cost of classes, clothes, equipment and other accessories, they spend 810.3 billion a year on their practice. The astute Lisa Cappuccio, says, "The ex- ercise that wears most people out is run- ning out of cash." And Bella Culo of Chest- nut Hill claims the best exercise today is hunting for bargains. Too much running backfires! Running too far too fast, especially in middle age, may take years off your life instead of improving your health. A new review of research shows that while regular runners lower their risk of early death by nearly 20 percent compared with non-runners, running more than 20 miles a week can actually be harmful and lead to cardiac damage. Running too fast -- at a pace faster than eight minutes a mile -- also seems to stress the heart. "After age 50, pushing too hard is probably not good for one's heart or longevity," James O'Keefe, a sports cardiologist at Saint Luke's Mid- America Heart Institute in Kansas City, MO, tells The Wall Street Jour- nal. A grow- ing body of O O O research  shows that extreme exercise can harden the coronary artery, a condition typically seen in people who are completely sedentary. Endurance athletes -- such as marathoners and tri- athletes -- also appear to be at higher risk of atrial fibrillation, a heart arrhythmia responsible for one in three strokes. Huh? Chemicals used to purify tap water may be causing food-allergy rates to sky- rocket in the U.S., a new study suggests. Researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine tested the urine of more than 2,0,00 people for dichlorophenols, chemicals found i1chlorine-treated tap water and in pesticides used on many fruits and veg- etables. They found that people with the highest levels of dichlorophenols in their bodies were 80 percent more likely to have food allergies -- most commonly to eggs, milk, peanuts, wheat, soy and shellfish -- than those with the lowest levels. Over the past 15 years, food-allergy rates have in- creased nearly 20 percent in the U.S., more than 3 million children younger than 18 have allergies with reactions that range from mild to deadly. "While the study does not allow concluding that pesticides are re- sponsible for the allergies, it certainly raises the possibility," Kenneth Spaeth, an expert on environmental pollutants at North Shore University Hospital on Long island, NY, tells ABCNews.com. Researchers think that Americans' increased exposure to dichlorophenols may be killing off healthy bacteria in the gut that help the immune system function properly, causing it to at- tack otherwise harmless proteins in food. A wee bit of Italian American history. Filippo Mazzei, a Tuscan physician, fought alongside Thomas Jefferson and Patrick Henry during the American Revolution. Mazzei drew up a plan to capture the British in New York by cutting off their sea escape and convinced France to help the Ameri- can colonists financially and militarily in their struggle against British rule. He also inspired the Jeffersonian phrase: "All men are created equal" when he wrote "All men are by nature equally free and independent." Mr. Peanut and the Planters Peanut Com- pany were created by Italian immigrants Amedeo Obici and Maria Peruzzi in 1887 in Pennsylvania. By 1930, the partners had four huge factories and raked in over $12 million annually. Obici was called "The Pea- nut King." And Mr. Coffee, the best-selling coffee maker in the world, was invented by Vince Marotta, who also invented the paper coffee filter and developed a better way to extract oil from coffee beans. Since 1972, more than 50 million Mr. Coffees have been sold. An estimated I0 billion Mr. Coffee paper filters are sold annually. Our distinguished musicologist Albert Natale with some interesting show business stuff. The producer of all but one of the first 17 James Bond movies was Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli. Broccoli launched the 007 film se- ries in 1962 with "Dr. No." His last film was "Golden Eye" in 1995. His ancestors devel- oped and named the popular vegetable broc- coli in Italy in the 19  century. A Chorus Line, one of Broadway longest running shows, was choreographed by the late Michael Bennett (born Michael DeFiglia), who received a Tony for his work. The late jazz pianist Dave Brubeck began playing with local bands when he was only 13 years old. His biggest hit: "Take Five." "You're Sensational" was one of the final ballads written by composer Cole Porter. Frank Sinatra sang it to Grace Kelly in the 1956 classic "High Society." And actress/singer Julie Andrews was a radio star in the late 1940s to the '50s on a pro- gram called "Educating Archie," in which she starred with ventriloquist Peter Brough. Wish to thank those of you who sent me Christmas cards. And thanks to Giuseppina, cosce storte, for the Baccala. AMERICA IS l BEAUTIFUL ITALIAN NAME Recipes from the Homeland by Vita Orlando Sinopoli COPYRIGHT, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED EGGPLANT PARMIGIANA 1 medium-size eggplant 2 cups prepared bread crumbs 2 beaten eggs 8 ounces shredded mozzarella cheese 1/4 cup Remand or Parmesan grated cheese 1 cup canola oil for frying Salt 8 ounces tomato sauce Peel dark skin off eggplant with paring knife or potato peeler. Slice eggplant into one-quarter-inch rounds. Layer slices on a fiat dish and salt lightly. Beads of liquid will appear on the slices as they rest one on top of the other. Cover eggplant with wax or plastic paper and place in the refrigerator for at least a half-hour. Meanwhile, warm up an eight-ounce can of prepared tomato sauce. FOR FRYING: With paper towels, wipe beads of liquid from each eggplant slice before dipping into beaten egg. Then coat with bread crumbs and set aside in a platter. Heat A cup of oil in a skillet. Place slices in heated oil and fry until brown on both sides. Place slices on paper towels to absorb the oil. Then set aside on a clean platter. Because eggplant slices absorb oil as they fry, additional oil may be needed in the skillet. FOR BAKING: Coat bottom of baking dish with some tomato sauce. Place one layer of eggplant slices over tomato sauce. Spread additional sauce over the eggplant, and sprinkle mozzarella cheese over sauce. Sprinkle some Remand or Parmesan cheese over the mozzarella (optiol). Continue layering the eggplant in that manner. Then pla(e the baking dish into the preheated 350F oven to bake for 25 to 30 minutes. Check occasionally to see that the top layer does not burn. Remove from oven when cheese has melted. Can be served hot or cooled. Remaining Eggplant Parmigiana must be refrigerated. NOTE: Eggplant Parmigiana can be served on a dinner plate together with linguine or spaghetti. This parmigiana became a favorite lunch in our home when served to us between two slices of Papa's Italian sliced bread. # RISTORANTE & BAR Traditional Italian Cuisine 415 Hanover Street, Boston 617.367.2353 11 MountVernon Street, Winchester 781.729.0515 PPivate Function i00ooms any Occasion Chpisleninq Show+00 BoI00, Show+00 BMMoq Etc. Donato Frattaroli donato @ luciaboston.com www.luciaristorante.com \\;/ITA'ORLANDO SINOPt)LI 1st Generation Italian-American Vita Orlando Sinopoli Shares with us a delightful recollection of her memories as a child growing up in Boston's "'Little Italy" and a collection of Italian family recipes from the homeland. Great as Gifts FROM MY BAKERY PERCH available on AMAZON.COM and in local bookstores -- ask for Hard cover #1-4010-9805-3 ISBN Soft Cover #1-4010-9804-5 ISBN