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POST-GAZE'n'E, JANUARY 27, 2017 PAGE 9 LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Middlesex Probate and Family Court 208 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI17P0158EA Estate of FRANCESCA H. HILL Date of Death September 10, 2016 CITATION ON PETITION FOR FORMAL ADJUDICATION To all interested persons: A Petition for Formal Probate of Will with Appointment of Personal Representa- tive has been filed by Edward W. Hill of Chelmsford, MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. The Petitioner requests that Edward W. Hill of Chelmsford, MA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve With- out Surety on the bond in an unsupervised administration. IMPORTANT NOTICE You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on the return day of February 9, 2017. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an affidavit of objections within thirty (30) days of the return day, action may be taken without further notice to you. UNSUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE MASSACHUSEI"rS UNIFORM PROBATE CODE (MUPC) A Personal Representative appointed under the MUPC in an unsupervised admin- istration is not required to file an Inventory or annual accounts with the Court. Persons interested in the estate are entitled to notice regarding the administration directly from the Personal Representative and may peti. tion the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including the distribution of assets and expenses of administration. Witness, HON. EDWARD F. DONNELLY, JR., First Justice of this Court. Date: January 12, 2017 Tara E. DeCdstofaro, Register of Probate Run date: 1/27/17 Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Middlesex Probate and Family Court 208 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI17P0262EA Estate of VYRL MAE ROBINSON Also Known As VYRL M. ROBINSON Date of Death December 3, 2016 CITATION ON PETITION FOR FORMAL ADJUDICATION To all interested persons: A Petition for Formal Probate of Will with Appointment of Personal Representative has been filed by William M. Robinson of Woburn, MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. The Petitioner requests that William M, Robinson of Woburn, MA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bend in an unsupervised administration. IMPORTANT NOTICE You have the dght to obtain a copy of the i Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on the return day of February 17, 2017. This is NOT a hearing date, but a dead- line by which you must file a written ap- pearence and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an affidavit of objections within thirty (30) days of the retum day, action may be taken with- out further notice to you. UNSUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE MASSACHUSE'n's UNIFORM PROBATE CODE (MUPC) A Personal Representative appointed under the MUPC in an unsupervised edmln- latration Is not required to file an inventory or annual accounts with the Court. Persons interested in the estate ere entitled to notice regarding the edminiatrotion directly from the Personal Representative and may peti- tion the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including the diatdbutlon of assets and expenses of administration. Witness, HON. EDWARD F. DONNELLY, JR., First Justice of this Court. Date: January 20, 2017 Tara E. DeCdstofaro, Register of Probate Run date: 1/27/2017 MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No{ M508-Cl, BLACK FALCON CRUISEPORT SWITCHBOARD AND PANELBOARD REPLACEMENTS, SOUTH BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Ha~orside Ddve, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2017 immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly. NOTE: PRE-BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) AT 1:00 P.M. LOCAL TIME ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2017. The work includes replacement of select switchboards and panelboards within Black Falcon Cruiseport. ELECTRICAL work. Bid documents will be made available beginning THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2017. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority's Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. In order to be eligible and responsible to bid on this contract General Bidders must submit with their bid a current Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance and an Update Statement. The General Bidder must be certified in the category of ELECTRICAL. The estimated contract cost is ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-FiVE THOUSAND DOLLARS (S175,000.00). Bidding procedures and award of the contract and sub-contracts shall be in accordance with the provisions of Sections 44A through 441 inclusive, Chapter 149 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid cons'rating of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub-bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub-bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer's or a cashier's check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massec.husetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to de business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the fa~ful performance by the pdndpal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and rnatedals payment bend, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the workas determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The-Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor end/or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of $1,000,000. Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. No filed sub-bids will be required for this contract. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authodty contained in the Non-Discrimination and Affirmative Action article of Division I, General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor's Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non-Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective sub-contractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSE'rrs PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO AND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Run date: 1/27/17 ABOUT THIS 8< THAT with Daniel A. DiCenso The Death of a Director While the death of Virginia Rappe ended the career of Fatty Arbuckel at a time when the comedian was at the height of his fame, the murder of direc- tor William Desmond Taylor in 1922 was a rain cloud over the head of Arbuckle's Keystone colleague Mabel Normand, just as her career was beginning to end. Although Normand was never a suspect in Taylor's murder, it did bring the more unsavory aspects of her life to light. Taylor had a relatively excit- ing life before he even arrived in Hollywood, having done gold prospecting and military service during WWI. After the war, he took to directing and was one of the pioneering hands.behind the rising movie medium. That all came to an end on February 2, 1922, when Taylor's body was found in his bungalow in the Westlake district of Los Angeles. After a crowd gathered at the sight, an unidentified man emerged claiming to be a doctor. He was allowed to make a cursory examination of the body and declared that Taylor had died of a stomach hemor- rhage. This casual autopsy was quickly dismissed when Taylor's body was turned over to au- thorities and it was discovered that the 49-year-old director had been shot in the back by a small caliber pistol. The gun was never found and the man claiming to be a doctor was never identified. The initial challenge was not just determining the killer, but also the motive. A large sum of money (how much exactly was never determined) that Taylor told his accountant about the day before was missing, but Taylor's jewelry, his watch, and $78 in his wallet were not taken, making robbery, although a possibility, inconclusive as a motive. Still trying to ward off the grimy reputation accumulated during the Fatty Arbuckle trial of the previous year, Holly- wood executives were quick to keep the eager media under control. Even the Los Angeles Undersheriff warned a Chi- cago Tribune reporter that, "rhe industry has been hurt. Stars have been ruined. Stockholders have lost millions of doUars. A lot of people are out of jobs, and incensed enough to take a shot at you." However, the authorities themselves found that the pres- sure turned on them. Famed director King Vidor recalled in 1968, "Last year I interviewed a LOs Angeles police detective, now retired, who had been assigned to the case immedi- ately after the murder. He told me, "qCe were doing all right and then, before a week was out, we got the word to lay off." This further complicated a" case that was already proving exceptionally frustrating. Sus- picion immediately turned to Taylor's valet, Edward Sands, who had a record of embezzle- ment, forgery, and military de- sertion. Indeed, he had robbed Taylor's bungalow the previ- ous year. Tellingly, when the murder was discovered, Sands skipped town and was never William Desmond Taylor heard from again. Investiga- tors then turned their attention to Taylor's next valet, Henry Peavey, who had been arrested three days earlier for vagrancy. But after questioning him, po- lice determined Peavey was not the killer. Attention then turned to two actresses who had been inti- mate with Taylor. The first was Mabel Normand who, like her frequent co-star Fatty Arbuckle, was one of the pioneers of film comedy. Along with Arbuckle and Charlie Chaplin, she got her start at Keystone Studios nearly a decade earlier and Mabel Normand was among the most popular stars of the early days of motion pictures. Taylor was known to have been deeply in love with Normand and was trying hard to help cure her cocaine addic- tion. When his efforts proved ineffective, Taylor started ask- ing for help from authorities to prosecute Normand's drug suppliers. One of the most prevalent theories to this day is that one of the drug dealers put a hit out for Taylor. Normand, however, had the misfortune of being the last person to see Taylor alive. She was seen by a neighbor leaving Taylor's bungalow in what was described as a "happy mood." She left his residence around 7:45 pm, and witnesses saw Taylor see her out to the cab. Not surprisingly, Normand was a chief person of interest and the police put her through a grueling interrogation. However, they soon determined that she was not guilty and released her. Much like Arbuckle, however, Normand's career took a final blow. As comedic styles were changing by the early '20s, her ditzy doll persona was beginning to fade. Once her drug addiction became public, her career's path accelerated downward. She died in 1930 of tuberculosis and, by all accounts, the murder of her lover tormented her until the end. Still, what the case did to the reputation of teen idol Mary Miles Minter was far uglier. There is little doubt that the 19-year-old Minter had become infatuated with the director more than twice her age. What remains in dispute is if Taylor shared those feelings. Be that as it may, Taylor kept a number of love letters from Minter, which were found when investigators scoured his home. The publica- tion of these letters came as a shock to the public, who had grown accustomed to seeing Minter as an innocent child star. Realizing the public would never accept her as the innocent girl they had molded her image into, Paramount executives refused to renew her contract after four more films. Although Minter was never suspected of the murder, her mother, Charlotte Shelby, always remained a shady figure. Police described her statements regarding her daughter's rela- tionship with the director as eva- sive and unforthcoming. It soon came out that Shelby owned a .38 caliber pistol with bul- lets matching those that IdUed Taylor, though this gun was never found. However, Shel- by's other daughter, Margaret, openly accused her mother of the murder, attributing her motivations as both maternal protection of Mary and jealousy, claiming her mother was herself enamored with the director. Police were never able to convict her, as all evidence was circum- stantiai and hearsay. Few other suspects emerged, but none caused quite the same stir as the confession of Mar- garet Gibson many years later after the case had been all but forgotten by the public. Gibson had worked with Taylor in a few pictures, but her career halted when she was convicted in 1917 of prostitution and drug use. Nonetheless, after changing her professional name, Gibson returned to acting. Shortly after Taylor's murder, she made a few films for ~amous Players-Lasky, the samd studio that employed the slain director. Gibson was never thought a suspect at the time an~ spent the rest of her life travelling throughout Asia, where she met her husband, who was stationed on a U.S. oil rig in Malaysia. Her hus- band was killed in 1942 when Japan attacked the oil rig and Gibson lived quietly offhis pen- sion. However, in 1964, on her deathbed, Gibson confessed to a witness that she was the one who had "shot and killed William Desmond Taylor." The murder of William Desmond Taylor, however, remains un- solved as no concrete evidence ever came to the surface. What we can be sure of is that it put studio heads further on edge and solidified the position of the morality code. Careers were tar- nished and things got ugly, and this is one more mystery hidden in the alleys of Tinsel Town.