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Page16 BOSTON POST-GAZETTE, JANUARY 31,2014 \\; ,,4b q ANGLE CARLINO Well-known fight photographer Angie Carlino passed away on January 19 th. Jgie was a fixture at ringside for many years and took photos of just about every fighter who stepped into the ring in New England. He will be missed. Rest in Peace Angle. DURAN v BUCHANAN Should Buchanan Have Been Declared the Winner by DQ The low blow. It was June 26, 1972 and the very popular Lightweight Champion from Scotland Ken Buchanan was stepping into the ring to defend his title against the challenger from Panama, Roberto Duran. Buchanan won the title in 1970 by outpointing champion Ishmael Laguna over 15 rounds under a very hot sun in San Juan, Puerto Rico. That same year the New York Boxing Writers' Association named him Fighter of the Year, the first time a non American was so honored. Ken was an active champion in both defending his title and also participating in non-title matches. He was well liked by fans in the United States. Duran was a relative unknown at the time of the fight. He had built up an impressive undefeated record scoring 28 straight wins with only four lasting the distance and eleven ending in the first round. He had just one fight in the United States scoring a sensa- tional one round knockout over journeyman Benny Huertas in NY on September 13, 1971. Was he a great knock out artist or just an- other unknown with a padded record? His trainers Ray Arcel and Freddie Brown knew the answer to that. They were two of the best in the business and worked hard to develop Duran's raw power into savvy boxing skills. The fight took place in Madison Square Garden before 18,000 fans. From the open- ing bell Buchanan knew he was in for a rough night as he hit the canvas within the first minute. Duran pressured and hammered Buchanan round after round. Bulling him into the ropes and slamming him with ev- erything in his arsenal. Despite the on- slaught, Buchanan fought back gamely. He used a very fast jab in an attempt to keep Duran at bay, but the challenger was able to counter that with a very sharp and powerful right hand. Duran was rough, tossing in elbows and a number of blows that were low as well as shoving and pushing Buchanan through the ropes. He was warned only once by referee Johnny LoBianco about the low blows, and that wasn't until the 12 th round. The fight was all Duran with Buchanan maybe winning one or two rounds going into the 11 . This is where I noticed a change in the dynamic of the fight. While the cham- pion certainly wasn't turning the tide, he was continuing to fight hard and hadn't slowed down. It was at this point I saw Duran be- coming frustrated with his inability to stop or to again floor Ken. He started getting wild Buchanan against the ropes versus Duran. with his punches and was talking to Buchanan. It was a frustration that I would later see in his rematch with Ray Leonard, tlhe famous No Mas Fight. Duran just had to keep the pressure on and continue with his game plan to win a decision, but he desper- ately wanted a knock out. In the comer you could see Ray Arcel getting angry with Roberto and urging him to calm down. Duran was starting to turn this into a more difficult fight as Buchanan was beginning to land on him. I am by no means implying Ken was taken charge of the fight, but it was becoming in- teresting. It also has to be remembered that Buchanan won the title by coming on in the late rounds against Laguna. In boxing it truly ain't over till it's over. Now for the controversy: The bell rings for the 13 t round and Duran comes out with fire in his eyes. He is all over the champion who continues to fight back gamely. Ken still has plenty of life left in his legs and is not going to give up his championship easily. Duran bulls him to the ropes, and fires away at him, but Roberto's punches are wider row, he is also getting hit with more jabs. He desperately wants to end the fight. He has Buchanan against the ropes when the bell sounds ending the round. After the bell rings Duran fires a right hand to the body that lands well below the belt line. The champion falls to the canvas in great pain. He is taken to his corner where the referee takes a quick look at him and stops the fight giving the title to Duran. Gil Clancy, who was working Ken's corner that night, made no protest over the stop- page. That was very odd behavior coming from the usually outspoken Clancy. When referee Johnny LoBianco was interviewed by com- mentator Don Dunphy immediately after the fight, he told Don it was not a low blow, and if it had been it would make no difference as it was "impossible" to be hurt by a low blow because of the protective cup being worn by the fighter. Look at the photo of the punch b,eing landed and you will clearly see it was low. If it had been called a low blow by the ref, Buchanan would have been given five min- utes to recover. Also, LoBianco did admit the punch landed after the bell. He said he stopped the fight because of that blow, and ff it hadn't landed he would have allowed the fight to continue. He clearly states he ended tlhe fight because of the blow, which by htis own admission, was landed illegally. He states that Buchanan was in no condition to continue because of that punch. Going by LoBianco's own words, Duran should have been disqualified and Buchanan allowed to retain his title. I know Duran was well ahead in the fight, but this fight ended because of an illegal blow, a fact that was acknowledged bY the referee. Questions linger. Why did Clancy remain silent? At the very least a protest would have ensured a rematch. Why did Duran's team refuse to fight Buchanan again? Why did LoBianco never referee another champion- ship bout? And finally, did we see a flaw in Duran that night that would lead to his quit- ting against Leonard years later? I believe Duran was one of the greatest fighters of all time. He was devastating, but as with all great fighters, he had his flaws. He would get frustrated with fast moving boxers, and, even though he would be beating them, he would become impatient if it appeared he was being outboxed. As controversies go, I am sure this doesn't rate high on a lot of fight fan's lists, but I still think there are questions to be answered. Check out the fight and pay attention to the interview with LoBianco. See what you think. You can find it on Youtube. Contact Bobby at bob2boxer@yahoo.com From the start things were different, yet some things were the same. They arrived as they always had but by a different method. This time it was by bus. After all, hadn't they always driven their own cars and parked outside? But the bus continued to- ward the building and went inside before coming to a stop. Only then did they disembark into a portion of the building that seemed foreign rather than familiar. Soon they were in the locker room but it wasn't the one they had considered theirs for so many nights over the' years. No, this was a dif- ferent one -- one that spoke of the temporary rather than the permanent that catered to itinerants rather than residents that was meant for a few hours stay rather than a season long encampment. They dressed and entered the tunnel. But that also had a different feel. It wasn't quite the same as the one at the other end of the floor. They came out onto the court for warm-ups and that also pro- vided a different orientation. Now they were on the other half of the court and their bench was the one assigned to visitors. Yes, that's the way it was for former Celtics Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett as they returned to the TD on Janu- ary 26 th as members of the Brooklyn Nets for their much heralded homecoming before a sold-out crowd of more than 18,000 adoring fans. But as the above example indicates: while you can come home again that doesn't mean that your former home area will always be the same. "It was hard for me to get to sleep (the night before the game)," said Pierce. I was in a downtown hotel in Boston when I'm used to being in my house. When we got to the arena we came in the back- side and made a left instead of a right. Everything was so different." The difference extended to their attire. They wore the uniforms of the Brooklyn Nets, ones that were almost entirely black in color and seemed to lend a somewhat funereal atmosphere to the team that represents that borough in New York City. It was certainly a vivid depar- ture from Celtics Green -- which reminds everyone of the verdant countryside of the Emerald Isle and of the warm, sunny days of summer. The game was a typical one for the C's these days -- an early lead, then remaining competitive for most of the contest before yielding in the closing moments of the fourth quarter. Although they have lost more than their fair share this winter, the Celtics remain contenders for the eighth and final playoff spot in the weak Eastern Conference. It's a very fluid situation but despite the large number of setbacks, the C's are only 31/2-41/2 games out of the final playoff spot as play begins On any given night. But once the proceedings began this night was one to honor the past rather than be far less than happy about the present. During a timeout in the first quarter Garnett was honored with a video tribute. Then after the first period concluded, another longer one was shown on the Jumbotron in honor of Pierce, who played for the Celtics for 15 seasons. "It was the toughest game I ever had to play," said Pierce in an emotional post- game press conference. "It was tougher than any cham- pionship game or any game seven. I got showered with love the whole game." For Garnett, who had worn Celtics Green for six years, it was much the same. "I got to see all the guys that made our stay worth it. The guys that people really don't know but make the whole thing go around -- the endless friend- ships through the place, the ball boys, the security guards, everybody. It was by far the hardest day that I've had to focus. This was bigger than Minnesota (where he played before coming to Boston). Even when I went back to Minnesota. Minne- sota wasn't like this." When asked to compare the experience to a playoff game, KG said there was no com- parison. "This was not even close. The impact of the people here on us and how much we've impacted their lives -- not just kids but grownups, just the culture here. You come here and you see all the (team) history and you feel the responsibil- ity to come back here and be showered like this, it's not even close, not even close." It was one of the most memorable press confer- ences held in the new Gar- den, which opened in 1995. Many times one hears a say- ing in pro sports -- it's all about the money. But with Pierce and Garnett -- at least on this night -- you could tell that it wasn't. It was about their relationship with a team, a franchise and a city. "It was a special thing for me," noted Pierce concern- ing his days with the C's. Through my bad times, my immature times, through my growing up and becoming a man and winning a champi- onship everybody stuck with me. I would just like to tell them thank you." Garnett's sentiments were similar. "I feel the same way. The New Englanders and everyone supported me here and were nice to me and my family. I just want to say thank you all from the bottom of my heart." Then it was over. They stood up and left the podium -- a pair of popular players from the past bidding a fond, formal farewell to their favor- ite franchise, an organization that now fields a team that is hopeful of the future while still experiencing trials as it seeks to find a path to a modicum of success. Page16 BOSTON POST-GAZETTE, JANUARY 31,2014 \\; ,,4b q ANGLE CARLINO Well-known fight photographer Angie Carlino passed away on January 19 th. Jgie was a fixture at ringside for many years and took photos of just about every fighter who stepped into the ring in New England. He will be missed. Rest in Peace Angle. DURAN v BUCHANAN Should Buchanan Have Been Declared the Winner by DQ The low blow. It was June 26, 1972 and the very popular Lightweight Champion from Scotland Ken Buchanan was stepping into the ring to defend his title against the challenger from Panama, Roberto Duran. Buchanan won the title in 1970 by outpointing champion Ishmael Laguna over 15 rounds under a very hot sun in San Juan, Puerto Rico. That same year the New York Boxing Writers' Association named him Fighter of the Year, the first time a non American was so honored. Ken was an active champion in both defending his title and also participating in non-title matches. He was well liked by fans in the United States. Duran was a relative unknown at the time of the fight. He had built up an impressive undefeated record scoring 28 straight wins with only four lasting the distance and eleven ending in the first round. He had just one fight in the United States scoring a sensa- tional one round knockout over journeyman Benny Huertas in NY on September 13, 1971. Was he a great knock out artist or just an- other unknown with a padded record? His trainers Ray Arcel and Freddie Brown knew the answer to that. They were two of the best in the business and worked hard to develop Duran's raw power into savvy boxing skills. The fight took place in Madison Square Garden before 18,000 fans. From the open- ing bell Buchanan knew he was in for a rough night as he hit the canvas within the first minute. Duran pressured and hammered Buchanan round after round. Bulling him into the ropes and slamming him with ev- erything in his arsenal. Despite the on- slaught, Buchanan fought back gamely. He used a very fast jab in an attempt to keep Duran at bay, but the challenger was able to counter that with a very sharp and powerful right hand. Duran was rough, tossing in elbows and a number of blows that were low as well as shoving and pushing Buchanan through the ropes. He was warned only once by referee Johnny LoBianco about the low blows, and that wasn't until the 12 th round. The fight was all Duran with Buchanan maybe winning one or two rounds going into the 11 . This is where I noticed a change in the dynamic of the fight. While the cham- pion certainly wasn't turning the tide, he was continuing to fight hard and hadn't slowed down. It was at this point I saw Duran be- coming frustrated with his inability to stop or to again floor Ken. He started getting wild Buchanan against the ropes versus Duran. with his punches and was talking to Buchanan. It was a frustration that I would later see in his rematch with Ray Leonard, tlhe famous No Mas Fight. Duran just had to keep the pressure on and continue with his game plan to win a decision, but he desper- ately wanted a knock out. In the comer you could see Ray Arcel getting angry with Roberto and urging him to calm down. Duran was starting to turn this into a more difficult fight as Buchanan was beginning to land on him. I am by no means implying Ken was taken charge of the fight, but it was becoming in- teresting. It also has to be remembered that Buchanan won the title by coming on in the late rounds against Laguna. In boxing it truly ain't over till it's over. Now for the controversy: The bell rings for the 13 t round and Duran comes out with fire in his eyes. He is all over the champion who continues to fight back gamely. Ken still has plenty of life left in his legs and is not going to give up his championship easily. Duran bulls him to the ropes, and fires away at him, but Roberto's punches are wider row, he is also getting hit with more jabs. He desperately wants to end the fight. He has Buchanan against the ropes when the bell sounds ending the round. After the bell rings Duran fires a right hand to the body that lands well below the belt line. The champion falls to the canvas in great pain. He is taken to his corner where the referee takes a quick look at him and stops the fight giving the title to Duran. Gil Clancy, who was working Ken's corner that night, made no protest over the stop- page. That was very odd behavior coming from the usually outspoken Clancy. When referee Johnny LoBianco was interviewed by com- mentator Don Dunphy immediately after the fight, he told Don it was not a low blow, and if it had been it would make no difference as it was "impossible" to be hurt by a low blow because of the protective cup being worn by the fighter. Look at the photo of the punch b,eing landed and you will clearly see it was low. If it had been called a low blow by the ref, Buchanan would have been given five min- utes to recover. Also, LoBianco did admit the punch landed after the bell. He said he stopped the fight because of that blow, and ff it hadn't landed he would have allowed the fight to continue. He clearly states he ended tlhe fight because of the blow, which by htis own admission, was landed illegally. He states that Buchanan was in no condition to continue because of that punch. Going by LoBianco's own words, Duran should have been disqualified and Buchanan allowed to retain his title. I know Duran was well ahead in the fight, but this fight ended because of an illegal blow, a fact that was acknowledged bY the referee. Questions linger. Why did Clancy remain silent? At the very least a protest would have ensured a rematch. Why did Duran's team refuse to fight Buchanan again? Why did LoBianco never referee another champion- ship bout? And finally, did we see a flaw in Duran that night that would lead to his quit- ting against Leonard years later? I believe Duran was one of the greatest fighters of all time. He was devastating, but as with all great fighters, he had his flaws. He would get frustrated with fast moving boxers, and, even though he would be beating them, he would become impatient if it appeared he was being outboxed. As controversies go, I am sure this doesn't rate high on a lot of fight fan's lists, but I still think there are questions to be answered. Check out the fight and pay attention to the interview with LoBianco. See what you think. You can find it on Youtube. Contact Bobby at bob2boxer@yahoo.com From the start things were different, yet some things were the same. They arrived as they always had but by a different method. This time it was by bus. After all, hadn't they always driven their own cars and parked outside? But the bus continued to- ward the building and went inside before coming to a stop. Only then did they disembark into a portion of the building that seemed foreign rather than familiar. Soon they were in the locker room but it wasn't the one they had considered theirs for so many nights over the' years. No, this was a dif- ferent one -- one that spoke of the temporary rather than the permanent that catered to itinerants rather than residents that was meant for a few hours stay rather than a season long encampment. They dressed and entered the tunnel. But that also had a different feel. It wasn't quite the same as the one at the other end of the floor. They came out onto the court for warm-ups and that also pro- vided a different orientation. Now they were on the other half of the court and their bench was the one assigned to visitors. Yes, that's the way it was for former Celtics Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett as they returned to the TD on Janu- ary 26 th as members of the Brooklyn Nets for their much heralded homecoming before a sold-out crowd of more than 18,000 adoring fans. But as the above example indicates: while you can come home again that doesn't mean that your former home area will always be the same. "It was hard for me to get to sleep (the night before the game)," said Pierce. I was in a downtown hotel in Boston when I'm used to being in my house. When we got to the arena we came in the back- side and made a left instead of a right. Everything was so different." The difference extended to their attire. They wore the uniforms of the Brooklyn Nets, ones that were almost entirely black in color and seemed to lend a somewhat funereal atmosphere to the team that represents that borough in New York City. It was certainly a vivid depar- ture from Celtics Green -- which reminds everyone of the verdant countryside of the Emerald Isle and of the warm, sunny days of summer. The game was a typical one for the C's these days -- an early lead, then remaining competitive for most of the contest before yielding in the closing moments of the fourth quarter. Although they have lost more than their fair share this winter, the Celtics remain contenders for the eighth and final playoff spot in the weak Eastern Conference. It's a very fluid situation but despite the large number of setbacks, the C's are only 31/2-41/2 games out of the final playoff spot as play begins On any given night. But once the proceedings began this night was one to honor the past rather than be far less than happy about the present. During a timeout in the first quarter Garnett was honored with a video tribute. Then after the first period concluded, another longer one was shown on the Jumbotron in honor of Pierce, who played for the Celtics for 15 seasons. "It was the toughest game I ever had to play," said Pierce in an emotional post- game press conference. "It was tougher than any cham- pionship game or any game seven. I got showered with love the whole game." For Garnett, who had worn Celtics Green for six years, it was much the same. "I got to see all the guys that made our stay worth it. The guys that people really don't know but make the whole thing go around -- the endless friend- ships through the place, the ball boys, the security guards, everybody. It was by far the hardest day that I've had to focus. This was bigger than Minnesota (where he played before coming to Boston). Even when I went back to Minnesota. Minne- sota wasn't like this." When asked to compare the experience to a playoff game, KG said there was no com- parison. "This was not even close. The impact of the people here on us and how much we've impacted their lives -- not just kids but grownups, just the culture here. You come here and you see all the (team) history and you feel the responsibil- ity to come back here and be showered like this, it's not even close, not even close." It was one of the most memorable press confer- ences held in the new Gar- den, which opened in 1995. Many times one hears a say- ing in pro sports -- it's all about the money. But with Pierce and Garnett -- at least on this night -- you could tell that it wasn't. It was about their relationship with a team, a franchise and a city. "It was a special thing for me," noted Pierce concern- ing his days with the C's. Through my bad times, my immature times, through my growing up and becoming a man and winning a champi- onship everybody stuck with me. I would just like to tell them thank you." Garnett's sentiments were similar. "I feel the same way. The New Englanders and everyone supported me here and were nice to me and my family. I just want to say thank you all from the bottom of my heart." Then it was over. They stood up and left the podium -- a pair of popular players from the past bidding a fond, formal farewell to their favor- ite franchise, an organization that now fields a team that is hopeful of the future while still experiencing trials as it seeks to find a path to a modicum of success.