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ii I: T,-GAZE'I-rE, MARCH 10, 2017 PAGE 9 abb)]nonno by John Christoforo A Nostalgic Remembrance Easter will be here before we know it and I thought I would begin my Easter stories with one that I've briefly mentioned a couple of times in the past. Of course, seeing that these events took place when my mother and uncles were kids, I can only relay excerpts from stories my mother and grandparents told me. It was the early 1920s when Babbononno purchased the house at 70 Eutaw Street in the Eagle HiU section of East Boston. Like many Italians, he and Nanna grew vegetables in the backyard. My grandfather even planted a peach tree in one of the comers of the yard that was separated from the yards of the houses to the left and right of us, and the yard jutting out from the house op- posite us, which was located on Monmouth Street. Oh by the way, the separation of yards was indicated by wooden picket fences, which my mother and uncles learned to climb over at early ages. It was 1924, I think, and Babbononno had built a shed in the backyard to house any- thing that should be covered during the winter or that he didn't want to store in the cel- lar of the house. Easter was on April 204 that year, so I guess the year was 1924. Anyway, Babbononno came up with an idea that winter. He decided to buy a live lamb and raise it for a few months and then slaughter it for Easter dinner. He insulated the inside walls of the shed and this is where the lamb slept at night; During the day, it was fed foods that would make it grow and fatten up. Everyone in the family knew the fate of the lamb and could almost experience the taste that could be expected on Easter. Everyone, with the exception of Uncle Gino. My youngest of uncles was going on seven and assumed that the new member of the family was just another pet, not unlike Babbononno's dog or Nanna's cat. I have a hunch that my uncle brought the lamb into the cellar of the house and played with it after school each day. If he did, I would assume that my uncle fed the animal a portion of the lunches that Nanna made him. By the time Babbononno would arrive home from work, the lamb would be back in the shed and his kids would be washed and ready to eat dinner. After dinner, my grandfather would take the scraps left over from the meal and bring some of them out to the shed. During the morn- ings, after Babbononno had left for work and her kids were at school, Nanna would feed the lamb. As a result of all of the food, the lamb grew tall and fat rapidly. Oh, just to set your minds at ease, the meat scraps weren't given to the lamb. The cat and dog enjoyed these leftovers. I don't know how old the lamb was when Babbononno bought him, but by the time April rolled around, it was large enough for slaughter and the Contini Easter dinner table. All of the Continis knew the facts and observed the readying process; that is, except Uncle G'mo. The lamb had become his personal pet. March the 5th was Ash Wednesday that year, and Bab- bononno began paying more attention to the lamb. Everyone knew why except my youngest of uncles, who probably assumed that his father loved the animal as much as he did. Babbononno did, but for different reasons. I don't know what things were like during the following few weeks, but after Palm Sunday, which was on April 13th that year, the Contini family began to prepare for Easter. New clothes, family attendance at Easter Mass, and Sunday dinner with the extended family invited to join in. Everything was happen- ing smoothly until the Contini family returned from Mass and Uncle G'mo headed out to the shed to play with his pet--but it was nowhere to be found. He was beside himself with worry until Nanna told him that the animal probably went for a walk and would be home later. -- FOR YOU WHO APPRECIATE THE FINEST -- THE MUSIC FOR ALL OCCASIONS 781-648-5678 Matt4o Gallo Appraisals Sales & Rentals Real Estate 376 North Street Boston, MA 02113 (617) 523-2100 * Fax (617) 523-3530 ''F'ff''ff ff'lflrf Once the extended family ar- rived, the children of Zi' Antonio and Zia Mariuccia (Nanna's brother and his wife) began to play with the Contini kids. The two families were always very close and several cousins would socialize long after they had families of their own. The inter- action of the two families made my uncle temporarily forget the disposition of his pet lamb. About an hour after the arrival of all of the people who were invited to Easter dinner, they were informed that it was time to sit at the dining room table. Nanna and my mother, who would turn 15 that May 17th, began to serve Easter dinner. First was the soup course, es- carole soup with pasta and tiny meatballs (the type that the Americans call Italian Wedding Soup). Next, the home-made ravioli, the meatballs, and the sausages, the chunks of gravy meat (especially the pork), the dishes of sauteed vegetables, the stuffed artichokes, stuffed mushrooms, the eggplant, and finally, the large roasted animal which was placed in the center of the table. Uncle Gino, being a rather intelligent young lad, put two and two together, and it added up to five. He looked at the roast that was placed in the center of the table, began to scream and ran from the table. No one could console him, and after a while; they left him to his own devices as he locked himself in his room and cried the rest of the day. That was Easter of 1924, 93 years ago. Uncle Gino will turn 100 this June, a survivor of many Pacific bathes during WWII. He is the father of two and the grandfather of four, a man who was successful in business all his life. But according to Aunt Ninna, his wife, my uncle hasn't eaten lamb since she has known him, and has stated that the story she got from my mother (may she rest in peace) indicated that Uncle Gino hasn't eaten lamb since that day in 1924. This was a fond memory from when my mother's generation was alive. Uncle Gino is the last one left of all his cousins. He is the last one of the first generation of my family born in America. Between Christmas and New Year's this past December, my son, John made arrangements to bring his new daughter, Lina, to visit her great-great uncle and aunt. He cooked a dinner for them and, along with my youngest son, Michael, and me in tow, headed to Uncle Gino's place. On the way home, I told my sons about the Easter dinner of 1924, when my mother and her brothers were kids and the lamb that was sacrificed for a holiday dinner. I~e never mentioned Easter of 1924 to my uncle. I wonder if I ever should??? GOD BLESS AMERICA I DIAMONDS 1 ROLEX ESTATE JEWELRY Bought & Sold Jewelers Exch. Bldg. Jim (617) 263-7766 Recipes from the Homeland by Vita Orlando Sinopoli !!i COPYRIGHT, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED PIZZA GHENA "eeeza Gay na'; Easter Ricotta Cheese Pie with Meats CRUST: 1/8 teaspoon black ground I cup lukewarm water pepper 2 to 3 packages dry yeast 6 to 7 cups flour-- preferably 6 tablespoons vegetable oil King Arthur or Gold Medal 1 teaspoon salt 1 beaten egg for egg wash 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar 1 9"x 12"x 3" bakingpan Preheat oven to 400F. Pour water into a bowl. Sprinkle yeast over water. Stir until yeast dissolves. Add oil, sugar, salt, pepper and stir. Add flour gradually until all water is absorbed. Add additional flour if dough is too soft. Work dough into a soft ball. Knead dough for a minute and then separate into two portions. Spray vegetable oil lightly into a bowl before placing the two portions in it. Cover and let dough rise to twice its size. Spray oil lightly over entire inside of baking pan. Moisten hands with oil for ease of spreading rises dough in baking pan. Then take one portion of crust dough ou: of bowl. Begin spreading and flattening it out by hand or with a rdling pin. Place it gently in the baking pan. Continue spreading b: hand until the dough covers the entire inside of pan (including tie four sides) 8.11 in one piece. Crust should be about 1/8 inch inthickness. Set aside. FILLING: 1/2 pound sliced Prosciutto * 8 beaten eggs I teaspoon salt I pound ricotta cheese 1/2 teaspoon black ground I pound freshformaggio pepper cheese *Other dried cured meats 1[2 cup fleshly grated such as sopressata, Romano cheese pepperoni, and various I/2 pound sliced ham of salami slices can be added choice* if desired. FILLING MIXTURE: In a large bowl, place ricotta ckeese, fresh cut-up formaggio cheese, grated Romano cheese, sat and pepper. Mix gently with a fork. Cut up ham and prosciutt(* slices into smaller portions and add to bowl. Add eight beater eggs. Using a fork or spoon, mix thoroughly. Gently pour filling tver bottom crust in the baking pan. Fill only about two-thirds of he baiting pan, leaving about one inch or more from top edge of ?an. Spread top crust to about 1/8 ofm inch in thickness and large enough to cover mixture as one piece in baking pan. Then place over mixture. With your fingers, gently crimp edges of the two crusts together and roll inward to seal mixture in baking pan. If desired, crimp edge portions with fork. This is necessary to prevent mixture from seeping through any openings while baking. With pastry brush, spread egg wish over entire top crust. Prick three or four small openings in topcrust to help moisture escape while baking. Place baking pan in middle shef of preheated 400F oven for one-half hour. Then lower to 350Fred continue baking for about three-quarters of an hour. Then lo~r oven to 300F and continue baking until the crust is golden br)wn. Check mixture after two hours of baking by inserting a thin mall knife into center. If knife blade comes out dry, mixture is coked. Cool this special Easter Pie for at last eight or nine hours for best results. Pie is served in square porbns. Makes 16 to 18 portions. LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachu~=tts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Middlesex Division 208 Cambridge Street East Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI17P1160EA Estate of PAUL WILUAM THAYER Also Known As PAUL W. THAYER Date of Death January 25, 2017 INFORMAL PROBATE PUBLICATION NOTICE To all persons interested in the above captioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner Scott D. Thayer of Branford, CT, a will has been admitted to informal probate. Scott D. Thayer of Branford, CT has been informally appointed as the Personal Representative of the estate to serve without surety on the bond, The estate is being administered under informal procedure by the Personal Represen- tative under the Massachusetts Uniform Pro- bate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but interested parties are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. Interested parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute formal proceedings and to obtain orders ter- minating or restricting the powers of Personal Representatives appointed under informal pro- cedure. A copy of the Petition and Will, if any, can be obtained from the Petitioner. Run date: 3/10/2017 Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Middlesex Division 208 Cambridge Street East Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI17P1174EA Estate of GLORIA ANN KING Also Known As GLORIA A. KING Date of Death January 29, 2017 INFORMAL PROBATE PUBLICATION NOTICE To all persons interested in the above aptioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner 'alede Papas of Belmont, MA, a Will has L, en admitted to informal probate. Valerie Papas of Belmont, MA has Isen informally appointed as the Personal Lepresentative of the estate to serve without urety on the bond. The estate is being administered under iformal procedure by the Personal Represen- itive under the Massachusetts Uniform Pro- ate Code without supervision by the Court. Iventory and accounts are not required to be led with the Court, but interested parUes are ntiifed to notice regarding the administration om the Personal Representative and can etition the Court in any matter relating to the 'state, including distribution of assets and ~xpensas of administration. Interested parties ire entitled to petition the Court to institute ormal proceedings and to obtain orders ter- minating or restricting the powers of Personal Representatives appointed under informal pro- cedure. A copy of the Petition and Will, if any, can be obtained from the Pe~oner. Run date: 3/1012017