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Page 12 POST-GAZETTE, MARCH 15, 2013 Ray Barron's 11 O'CLOCK NEWS Wow! The brilliant Hillary Clinton will soon hit the speaking circuit, ,charging upwards of $200,000 per speech. Her husband, Bill, gets an average of $189,000 per event. Most politicians have four speeches: what they have written down, what they actually say, what they wish they had said and what they are quoted as saying the next day. The popular Russian nationalist politician Vladimir Zhirinovsky proposed banning overeating and "excessive" sex, which he blames for Russia's low life expectancy. "In Europe, America or Japan they live longer," he said. "Why should we perish?" Kicking the habit, after a British woman gave up cigarettes on her 102 "d birthday over fears they could shorten her life. Clara Cowell has smoked 60,000 cigarettes since her first one in 1931. Street food, after Montana lawmakers pasgd a bill allowing residents to bring home and eat ad-killed game such as bears and bighorn sheep. "People hit a lot of animals," said state Rep. Steve Lavin. "there's a lot of good meat being wasted out there." Am I boring you? Hang inI Drivers in a cash-strapped suburb of Houston will soon be charged a "crash tax" if they get into an accident. The new fee will range from $500 to $2,000, depending on the severity of the accident and will be used to cover the cost of sending police, paramedics and fire trucks to the scene. "Don't we pay them to do that already?" asked local motorist Meredith Johnson. Are you still awake? Some March histori- cal events: March 3, 1931 -- Star Spangled Banner was adopted as our National Anthem of the United States. On March 4, 1861 Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated as the 16 th President of the United States. March 10, 1876 was Alexander Graham Bell's first telephone call. In 1888, March 11-14, A ma- jor snowstorm "the blizzard of '88" strikes the eastern United States killing 400 people. Also in the year 1888, on March 16 th, Louisa May Alcott, 56, author of Little Women and other juvenile classics, died in Concord, Massachusetts. Ah Springl Rosalie Cunio reminds us; the best thing about spring is that it always comes when it is most needed. Mona-Lisa Cappuccio says, "Another of life's ironies is to have house cleaning, gardening and spring fever all come at the same time." Robyn Waters says, "In the spring many a husband is transferred from the doghouse to the garden." Barbara D'Amico claims spring comes unusually late or unusually early every year-as usual. And Christina Quinlan says, =Take a lesson from spring: say it with flowers." Shame! Shame! The former mayor of San Diego has admitted to taking more than $2 million from a charity set up by her late husband after wagering more than $1 bil- lion in the course of a decade-long gambling addiction. Maureen O'Connor, 66, mayor from 1986 to 1992, pleaded not guilty to money laundering, saying she turned to "grief gambling" in 2001 to deal with the death of her husband, fast-food tycoon Robert O. Peterson, the founder of Jack in the Box restaurants. O'Connor said that a brain tumor caused her to lose control of her ac- tions. "There are two Maureens -- Maureen No. I and Maureen No. 2," she told a news conference. "Maureen No. 2 is the Maureen who did not know she had a tumor in her brain." She has been given two years to pay the charity back and will receive treatment for her gambling addiction. Bella Culo of Chestnut Hill says, "People who can afford to gamble don't need money, and {hose who need money can't afford to gamble." A North End wit says people shouldn't get married on Sunday because it's not right to gamble on a Holy Day. For you fatheads Paul Mason is one third the man he used to be, said Sarah Lyall in The New York Times. Ten years ago, the former British postal worker ballooned up to 980 pounds and was labeled "the world's fattest man." Mason start.ed overeating in 1986 when he quit his job to care for his arthritic 0 0 0 mother. "I had all these things going around my head from my child- hood," he says. "Food replaced the love I didn't get from my parents." Every penny of his and his mother's government checks was spent on food and he consumed 20,000 calories a day eight times what an aver- age man should eat. Restaurants and stores ferried him snacks around the clock. "They didn't deliver bags of potato chips, they delivered cartons." His obesity left him bed- bound and in 2003 firefighters had to use a forklift to carry him to the hospital. When his mother died in 2009, Mason decided to seek help. He underwent gastric bypass sur- gery, started dieting and is now down to 336 pounds one third of which is excess skin. At 52, he only wishes he'd taken action b,efore becoming the world's fattest man. "I don't like that title because I wasn't going to be the world's fattest man forever." Carlo Scostumato claims women are never satisfied: they are always trying to take off weight, put it on or rearrange it. According to Steven Sebestyen, "It isn't how much a woman weighs that's impor- tant -- it's where she carries the weight." Steven's brainy and beautiful wife Theresa says, "Many a woman's fondest wish is to be weighed and found wanting." Riding high! Flying on an airplane makes it more likely you'll suffer a bout of flatu- lence, a new scientific study has concluded. The study by a team of gastroenterologists found that changes in cabin pressure alter the volume of gases in our intestines lead- ing to little eruptions. Trying to restrain the farting from occurring, the doctors warned, could lead to "significant drawbacks," such as indigestion and stomach pain, though they note that "proximity to other passen- gers may cause conflict and stigmatization of the offending individual." Huh? A Gallup, groundbreaking survey of more than 200,000 Americans has found that 3.5 percent of the population identifies as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender. U.S. Rep. Paul Broun, (R-GA), said that "there are more people killed by baseball bats and hammers than are killed with guns." This is myth. In 201 I, FBI data shows 8,583 people were murdered with firearms. Only 496 people were killed with baseball bats, hammers and other objects. Some revelations about Italians! In col- laboration with the great musicologist Al Natale, the great actor Alfred Drake who was the star as Curly in Oklahoma and other plays was born Alfred Capurro in the Bronx, New York. Wladziu Valentino Liberace is the son of an Italian-born father and a Polish mother. Stripper Ann Corio, the star of Broadway's This Was Burlesque and who once appeared at Boston's Old Howard won a dance contest at the age of 15 and joined a burlesque troupe. Her mother "had never heard of burlesque" and as Ann recalls, her "great line" that showed her approval of her daughter's chosen profession was: "They look, but no touch." Quinton Cristy, born in Brockton, went to Hollywood at an early age, appearing as a tenor in films and sang on the N.B.C. radio network. And one of the greatest Italian comedians of the American screen Henry Armetta was born at Palermo, Italy. Armetta made his way aboard a ship at the age of 14 as a stowaway and wasn't discovered until he and the ship landed in Boston. Young Henry was turned over to the police. A barber, John Armato, guaranteed to give the boy a home if they would release him. The rest is history! Armetta made it in Hollywood! As an Italian character come- dian his services were in great demand in films. A reminder! It was on April 25, 1507, a world map produced by German cartographer Martin Waldseemueller contained the first recorded use of the term "America," in honor of Italian navigator Amerigo Vespucci. AMERICA IS l BEAUTIFUL ITALIAN NAME Homeland by Vita Orlando Sinopoli COPYRIGHT, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED PIZZA GHENA "Peeza Gay na" Easter Ricotta Cheese Pie with Meats CRUST: 1/8 teaspoon black ground 1 cup lukewarm water pepper 2 to 3 packages dry yeast 6 to 7 cups flour - preferably 6 tablespoons vegetable oil King Arthur or Gold Medal 1 teaspoon salt I beaten egg for egg wash 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar 1 9" x 12" x 3" baking pan Pour water into a bowl. Sprinkle yeast over water. Stir until yeast dissolves. Add oil, sugar, salt, pepper and stir. Add flour gradually until all water is absorbed. Add addi- tional flour if dough is too soft. Work dough into a soft ball. Knead dough for a minute and then separate into two por- tions. Spray vegetable oil lightly into a bowl before placing the two portions in it. Cover and let dough rise to twice its size. Spray oil lightly over entire inside of baking pan. Moisten hands with oil for ease of spreading risen dough in baking pan. Then take one portion of crust dough out of bowl. Begin spreading and fattening it out by hand or with a rolling pin. Place it gently in the baking pan. Continue spreading by hand until the dough covers the entire inside of pan (including the four sides) all in one piece. Crust should be about 1/8 inch in thickness. Set aside. FILLING: 8 beaten eggs 1 pound ricotta cheese 1 pound fresh formaggio cheese 1/2 cup freshly grated Romano cheese I/2 pound sliced ham of choice* FILLING MIXTURE: 1/2 pound sliced Prosciutto* 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon black ground pepper *Other dried cured meats can be added such as sopressata, pepperoni, and various salami slices if desired. In a large bowl place ricotta cheese, fresh cut-up formaggio cheese, grated Romano cheese, salt and pepper. Mix gently with a fork. Cut up ham and Prosciutto* slices into smaller portions and add to bowl. Add eight beaten eggs. Using a fork or spoon, mix thoroughly. Gently pour filling over bottom crust in the baking pan. Fill only about three-quarters of the baking pan, leaving about one inch or more from top edge of pan. Spread top crust to about 1/8 of an inch in thickness and large enough to cover mixture as one piece in baking pan. Then place over mixture. With your fingers, gently crimp edges of the two crusts together and roll inward to seal mix- ture in baking pan. If desired, crimp edge portions with fork. This is necessary to prevent mixture from seeping through any openings while baking. With pastry brush, spread egg wash over entire top crust. Prick three or four small openings of top crust to help mois- ture escape while baking. Place baking pan in middle shelf of preheated 400F oven for one-half hour. Then lower to 350F and continue bak- ing for about three-quarters of an hour. Then lower oven to 300F and continue baking until the crust is golden brown. Check mixture after two hours of baking, insert a thin small knife into center. If knife blade comes out dry, mixture is cooked. Cool this special Easter Pie for at least eight or nine hours for best results. Pie is served in square portions. Makes sixteen to eighteen portions. NOTE: Rose OHarcantonio) Sinopoli, my sister-in-law, has been encouraged yearly by her brother Dr. Joseph Marcantonio to prepare their mother's (Antonietta Pisano Marcantonio) origi- nal Pizza Ghena recipe. The family traveled from Avellino to America in the early 1920s, settling in Boston's North End be- fore moving to Roslindale. For many years my husband and I have been privileged to taste some of Rose's delicious Pizza Ghena. Because Rose makes such a large pie each year for all mem- bers of her family, she kindly reduced the original size of the recipe so I can share this smaller-size recipe with you. Vita can be reached at voswriting @comcanet about adveisingin iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iithe PostGazette;iiiii! :iii:;i;iii!ililiiiiili11:61ii!227892;9i;:;i!;i ST. JUDE AND ST, ANTHONY NOVENA May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world now and for- ever. Sacred Heart of Jesus pray for us. St. Jude, worker of miracles, pray for us. St. Jude, help of the hopeless, pray for us. St. Anthony, most loving protector and wonder worker, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day and by the 8th day your prayer will be answered. It has never been known to fail. Publication must be promised My prayers have been answered. Favor received A.T.P.