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le Page 10 ., POST.GA,ETTE,3-UII.EI;2,0,:I, ... Before I begin this week's column, I want to wish Uncle Gino a happy birthday. Lou Conitni, affectionately referred to as "Uncle Gino," will be 95 next week. He is the last of the chil- dren of Nanna and Babbo- nonno that represented the first generation of the fam- ily born in America. Fortu- nately, he is in good health and is enjoying retirement with his wife, Ninna. Their children, Richard and Donna, are close by and with their kids, represent the extended family concept that is so much a part of our Italo American culture. To my dear uncle, "Felice eompleano e cienti ani." Last week, I was talking about the family in the early '40s. Dad and Uncle Nick had been on the road with the big bands of the swing era in the '30s, but headed home when a war seemed eminent. Uncle Nick played with Boston's society bands just about every night of the week. Dad joined the Jimmy McHale Orchestra and played six nights a week in a night- club called the Fife and Drum Room located on the lower level of the Hotel Vendome on Commonwealth Avenue. Uncle Nick and Aunt Ado lived in the same apartment in Allston that they had oc- cupied since marrying in the early 1930s. Morn and Dad lived around the corner Nanna 00Babb00onno from them until I came along and then moved back to Nanna and Babbononno's place in East Boston. Babbononno had made an apartment on the third floor of the house and Uncle Paul, his oldest son, his wife, Aunt Eleanor and their children, cousins Paula and Ellie. The house was big enough for my folks to have a bedroom of their own and I had a child's room that doubled as a music studio during the daytime hours. Just as the war started, Babbononno was working as a furniture maker by day and a musician by night, Uncle Paul as a printer during the day and he too, a musician at night. Dad decided to go to work days, something he hadn't done since he was right out of high school. My father had graduated East Boston High School in 1929. He was in their machine shop program and went to work for an iron works by day after graduation. As a matter of fact, the company he worked for put up the superstructure for the Seville Theater and Dad LEGAL NOTICE MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. W190-C1, MISCELLANEOUS PAVEMENT REPAIRS, AT WORCESTER REGIONAL AIRPORT, WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:IX] A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 2012, immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly. NOTE: PRE-BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE WORCESTER REGIONAL AIRPORT, AIRPORT DIRECTOR'S OFFICE, 2" FLOOR, TERMINAL BUILDING, 375 AIRPORT DRIVE, WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS, AT 10:00 AM ON THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2012. The work includes: BASE BID: PAVEMENT RECLAMATION, PLACEMENT OF HOT MIX ASHPALT, TACK COAT, UNCLASSIFIED EXCAVATION, REMOVAL AND DISPOSAL OF BITUMINOUS CONCRETE PAVEMENT, ADJUSTMENT OF UTILITY STRUCTURE FRAMES, GRATES AND COVERS, INSTALLATION OF STORM DRAINAGE PIPING AND INLET STRUCTURES, PAVEMENT SAW CUTTING AND SEALING, REPAIR AND RESETTING OF EXISTING GRANITE CURBING, APPLICATION OF COAL TAR EMULSION SEAL COAT, AND INSTALLATION OF NEW MGI.R" POLES AND FIXTURES ON EXISTING CONCRETE BASES. ADD ALTERNATE NO. 1: REPLACEMENT OF EXISTING CONCRETE LIGHT POLE BASES, REFURBISHING AND INSTALLATION OF EXISTING LIGHT POLES. Bid documents will be made available beginning WEDNESDAY JUNE 6, 2012. The estimated contract cost is $580,000.00. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority's Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub-bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub-bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer's or a cashier's check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bend and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the SpecificalJons, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and/or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of THREE MILLION DOLLARS ($3,000,000.00). Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be induded as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. This contract is subject to a Minority/Women Owned Business Enterprise perficipetion prevision requiring that not less than RVE PERCENT (5%) of the Contract be performed by disadvantaged business enterprise contractors. With respect to this provision, bidders are urged to familiarize themselves thoroughly with the Bidding Documents. Strict compliance with the pertinent procedures will be required for a bidder to be deemed responsive and eligible. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in Article 84 of the General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor's Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246'). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non-Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY DAVID S. MACKEY INTERIM CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER and EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Run date: 06/01112 by John Christoforo A Nostalgic Remembrance worked on it. Little did any- one know that a generation later, his son {yours truly) would spend ten years as an usher at the same place. When Dad decided to ac- cept a day job due to the war, he said yes to teaching ma- chine shop and shop math at his old alma mater, East Boston High School. A voca- tional program graduate with seven years experience in a specific trade was allowed to teach that trade in public schools without a college degree; just the vocational experience was enough. Dad thought it would be a tempo- rary position until the war was over, but conversations with a close friend would change his mind. Gordon Seabury was a business exec during the day and a musician by night. He and Dad had become close friends over the years and Gordon's advice changed Dad's look into the future. Gordon told my father that things were going to be dif- ferent after the war and he should consider playing music as a secondary profes- sion, as things would prob- ably change once the ser- vicemen came home. Dad took his advice and stayed with the Boston Public Schools for the next 30 years. Things did slowly change in music after the war. The big bands gave way to smaller groups and the music changed by the early '50s. And, with the emer- gence of rock and roll in the mid '50s, the whole world of entertainment headed in a different direction. Many of Dad's musician friends who didn't have day jobs were left by the way side and some even wondered where their next meal was going to come from. I don't remember living in Allston. My first recollections of life were at 70 Eutaw Street in East Boston. I played with cousin Paula who was a bit older than I. I remember when her sis- ter, my cousin Ellie, was born and they lived upstairs. If I tap my memory bank, I can remember being in a high chair in Nanna's kitchen. It was New Year's Eve, December 31, 1941. I was three years old and the family was waiting for Dad and Uncle Nick to come home from their New Years Eve jobs. They both arrived in their ears with the top half of the head lights painted black and gasoline stickers on the passenger's side of the front windshield. Most cars had the capital letter A on the sticker. This meant that the owner was entitled to 5 gallons of gas per week. Dad, Uncle Nick and Uncle Paul had the letter B, which allowed a few more gallons due to them not knowing the distances to some of their jobs. Other than work, they didn't drive very much as the gas rationing was ac- companied by the absence of ,i,,,,,,,,i iii,ii,i ii i tires. Once the war started, they weren't available. At dinner, the family talked about the war. The men of the family knew that they would have to do their part to help the Ameri- can cause and discussed what each wanted to do. Babbononno would have another glass of wine and curse Mussolini and his Fas- cist government. He hated the Germans and considered them the barbarians that brought the Roman Empire to its knees. After Pearl Harbor, he aIded the Japa- nese to his hate list. Every- one at the dinner table listened to what the men of the family had to say about the war. The next thing I knew, Uncles Nick and Gino were in uniform. Uncle Nick, to avoid the draft, joined the navy. This sounded strange to Babbononno because his middle son couldn't even swim. Uncle Gino had gone to work at the navy yard after graduating from high school and opted for the army air corps. Soon, they were gone. After basic train- ing, Uncle Gino was as- signed to the 5 th Air Force and sent to fight in the Pacific. Uncle Nick lucked out. He auditioned for the Andre Kostelanetz Orches- tra, which was stationed at the Newport Naval Base. He spent the duration of the war playing sax and clarinet in the band that serenaded the return of our war ships and played the social func- tions for the navy brass. Dad had thought about joining the marines, but he waited. One day his princi- pal asked him to step outside the EBHS machine shop and speak to a couple of gentle- men. Then turned out to be members of the OSS, the forerunner to today's CIA. They were looking for someone to interrogate Italian war prisoners, many of whom were brought to Boston and housed at forts on some of our harbor is- lands and at the long-closed immigration station on Mar- ginal Street in East Boston. He agreed to join forces with them which exempted him from the active military. These were just a few of the things I remembered from when I was a child, and I will pick up the story at this point next week. GOD BLESS AMERICA. LEGAL NOTICE MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. L1220-C1, MISCELLANEOUS ROADWAY REPAIRS, LOGAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, EAST BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 2012 immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly. NOTE: PRE-BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) AT 10:00 A.M. LOCAL TIME ON THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2012, - The work includes PAVEMENT MILLING (EXISTING HMA AND CONCRETE) HOT MIX ASPHALT PAVING, PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT, REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT OF EXISTING TRENCH DRAINS, UTILITY ADJUSTMENTS, SIDEWALK REPA!RS, AND PAVEMENT MARKINGS. Bid documents will be made available beginning WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6, 20!2. The estimated contract cost is $1,000,000.00. .... Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority's Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub-bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent O f the sub-bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer's or a cashier's check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and/or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of $1,000,000.00. Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of DMsion I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. This contract is subject to a Minority and Woman Owned Business Enterprise participation provision requiring that not less than TWELVE PERCENT (12%) of the Contract be performed by minority and women owned business enterprise contractors. With respect to this provision, bidders are urged to familiarize themselves thoroughly with the Bidding Documents. Strict compliance with the pertinent procedures will be required for a bidder to be deemed responsive and eligible. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in Article 84 of the General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor's Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non-Segragated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY DAVID S. MACKEY INTERIM CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER and EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Run date: 06/01/12