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June 5, 2015     Post-Gazette
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June 5, 2015
 

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Page 4 POST-GAZETTE, JUNE 5, 2015 At the beginning of the heat from a brightly shining month, I have a special sun. June is the end of the by Sal Giarratani ritual. I open to the new school year, a month of out- page on my desk calendar and look through the days of the month, decorating holi- days or anniversaries with quirky doodles. Each new month is like an unwrapped gift, quivering with antici- pation and a sense of mys- tery. Indeed, I have always been fascinated by months and, more importantly, their essence. In my mind, every month of the year has a unique character, an under- lying trait that sets its days apart from those of other months. Holidays, saints' days, superstitions, family occurrences -- all of these events add up to a rich and particular tapestry that typifies any month. During the olden days, when soci- ety was primarily based on agriculture, people viewed months as separate entities, depending on the weather and cycles of the sun and moon to help them plant. This is a much more roman- tic view than the way we perceive months in the modem era, when calendars are synonymous with busy schedules and frozen fruits allow us to eat out of season. I believe that we should reclaim the aura of unique- ness that surrounds each month, enjoying them for their own properties and emotions. For a model on how to do this, we must turn to Italy. The magic of each month is deeply ingrained in Ital- ian folklore. No matter the season, one can be sure that any given month abounds with its own proverbs and superstitions. Take our cur- rent summery month of June. In Italy, the peasants of yore bequeathed a num- ber of weather-related prov- erbs that looked ahead to the harvest of late summer, or simply commented on the climate that characterized the month. One saying declares: "Giugno ventoso, porta presto il grano suU'aia," meaning that a windy June will soon bring the grain to the farmyard. Another prov- erb, which reads "In giugno, in bene o in male, c' sempre un temporale," warns that in June, no matter how good or bad the weather has been, there will always be a rain- storm! Other proverbs relate (Photo by Alamy) to the feast days of the saints, which dot the Italian calendar and provide people with a focus for religious devotion and a reckoning system for determining important dates in the agri- cultural year. Italians may repeat the rhyme "Per San Barnabd, il pift lungo della 'sta." This roughly trans- lates that the feast day of St. Barnabas, or June 11 th, is the longest day of the summer, referring to the fact that this date actually coincided with the summer solstice in the years before the Gregorian calendar reform. A charming yet slightly foreboding dictum declares: "La notte di San Giovanni, ogni erba nasconde inganni." This means that on June 23 rd, the eve of St. John the Baptist's feast day, every herb hides some form of deceit -- a callback to the old tradition of gath- eringl herbs on this night, when it was believed that the magic of the summer solstice imbued them with mystical healing properties. Finally, other proverbs sim- ply relish the bounty of nature available in June, such as "Giugno ciliege a pugno," which means that cherries are plentiful in June. What a lovely month these proverbs reveal! Now, whenever I think of the months of the year, I try to focus on the exceptional qualities of each. January means deep drifts of snow and sparkling ice under an ever-lightening sky. Febru- ary brings an explosion of red hearts and lace, and eerie masks for Carnivale. March is the month of green, of brisk winds and shamrocks. April recalls daffodils peek- ing out from the ground and baskets laden with pastel eggs. May translates to an abundance of flowers and the first hints of summer Since 1969 FOR ALL YOUR INSURANCE NEEDS RICHARD SETTIPANE Public Insurance Adjuster Experience makes the difference t. 209 BROADWAYp REVERE, MA 02151 Tel. 781.284.1100 Fax 781.284.2200 Boston 617.523.3456 Free Parking Adjacent to Building door excursions and myste- rious evenings eating out under the pale twilight of late evening. July includes fireworks bursting across a starry dark sky, trips to the rolling ocean waves or the energetic city. August is golden, like ripening grain, with mornings that smell like the woodsy charm of autumn. September means harvest and rhythm, red and yellow leaves and the glori- ous crunch of apples. Octo- ber is synonymous with shadowy nights and glow- ing pumpkins, with the wind spookily whistling through bare tree branches. November simultaneously means the chill of early winter and the warmth of family gatherings, sharing an abundance of food. Finally, December envelops jingling bells and flickering candles, holidays of light and family and goodwill. Col- lectively, all of the months complement each other, adding to that indelible cycle we call the year. This month, think of all the wonderful feelings and sensations that June brings to you, whether they relate to the summer season, a birthday or anniversary, or even a food you enjoy. We all would reap the benefits of living each month for its uniqueness, as this allows us to focus on the present moment and relish all the beauty that life and nature afford. Let us go on to look at each month not simply as a page on a calendar, but an opportunity ripe for celebra- tions and markings of the passage of time. That way, every month is a proverbial gift for us, granting us both the transience and endur- ance of time. Ally Di Censo Symynkywicz is a Graduate Student in History at the University of Massachusetts Boston. She appreciates any comments and suggestions about Italian holidays and folklore at adicenso89@gmail, com. LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Middlesex Probate and Family Court 208 Cambridge Street Cambridge, .MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI15D1636DR DIVORCE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION AND MAILING JOSE E. BORDON VS. ALBA M. BORDON To the Defendant: The Plaintiff has filed a Complaint for Divorce requesting that the Court grant a divorce for rretr evab e Breakdown 1B ' . . '. I The Complaint is on file at the Court. An Automatic Restraining Order has been' entered in this matter preventing you from taking i any action which would negatively impact the current f nanc a status of ether party. SEE Supplemental Probate Court Rule 411. [ You are hereby summoned and required to serve upon Jose E. Bordon, 50A Second Street, Framingham, MA 01702 your answer, if any, on or before June 29, 2015. If you fail to do so, the court will proceed to the hearing and adjudication of this action. You are also required to file a copy of your answer, if any, in the office of the Register of this Court. WITNESS, HON. EDWARD F. DONNELLY, JR., First Justice of this Court. Date: May 15, 2015 Tara E. DeCristofaro, Register of Probate Run date: 6/5/15 #someblacklivesdon 'tmatter Thank God the month of May is over for residents of Baltimore, which just wit- nessed one of its bloodiest months in its history. I just heard over this past week- end that the City of Balti- more had its 37 th and 38 th murdered victim as the month ended. Last week, I started watch- ing "Texas Rising" about the immediate aftermath of the fall of the Alamo and the fight for freedom led by Sam Houston. I thought of that and of what America has been viewing lately down in Baltimore. I probably could have named this com- mentary, "Baltimore Falling," but my concern is less for Baltimore's free-fall and more about the lack of con- cern about all those name- less victims dying on the streets of that city and other cities across the nation lately. Like that young mother and her little child who re- main nameless, apparently because not all black lives really do matter, do they? It is seemingly going to be a hot violent summer for America harkening back to the .summer of '67. As a police officer, I do not condone the actions of bad cops doing bad things. All professions have bad apples. Over 27 years on the job, I ran into a few, but too few to count or worry about. There are bad surgeons, bad plum- bers, bad bankers and yes more than a-few bad politi- cians too. Since last summer in Fer- guson, we have seen a rush to judgment against law en- forcement that would never be considered against other professions out there. The deconstruction of our police departments by the media, community rabble- rousers and high profile elected leaders has been a national disgrace. Starting at the top last summer with President Obama, former A.G. Eric Holder, NY Mayor Bill de Blasio and whats-her- name, the mayor of Balti- more have been tearing down the police to the point that many wonder why they ever became police. Think about it, since all the cop- bashing, police officers have been getting killed much too often and when they do their lives matter not to anyone anywhere or at least that is how it feels. Respect for law enforce- ment is at an all time low and too often rabble-rousers like Rev. AI Sharpton and many others seemingly use horrible tragedies for their own ego purposes. A cop ends up killing a black suspect and marches get organized across the nation. A young mother and child get killed inside Baltimore and no one even knows their names and seemingly doesn't care that much either. I believe all lives matter all the time. Neighborhoods across this country are rot- ting from the inside out and it is considered not news nothing to see just keep moving on. The May 31 st New York Post front page headline read: "WE NEED STOP AND FRISK." The quote from a relative of one of the four slain on Friday, May 31 st in New York City. Mayor de Blasio says to- day isn't like the bad old days "when a lot of everyday citizens were caught in the crossfire. It was a horrible, horrible time." I guess those last four victims weren't everyday people? Tell that to the uncle of one of those killed quoted on the NY Post front- page, huh? Society across the country seems in a free-fall. I still remember vividly when my old neighborhood in St. Philip's parish started its free-fall nearly 50 years ago. It was a very helpless feeling for those who remained into the late '60s when they witnessed the end of a once vibrant neighborhood. We need the police now more than ever to hold the order of society from return- ing to the Wild, Wild West again when no one was ever really safe from the bad guys circling around like preda- tory birds looking for dinner below. I am proud of my service as a police officer and know that most police officers out there are no different than I am. Wearing a badge is a very dangerous and unappreciated calling. The so-called thin blue line is what separates us from the jungle. There are good guys and bad guys all around us and the good guys must win if we are to have a future before us. As I said, "all lives matter and must matter all the time by all of us. Our future depends on it." LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Middlesex Probate and Family Court 208 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI15D1659DR DIVORCE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION AND MAILING NICOLE K. DRAPER VS. SERGIO TINGANELLI To the Defendant: The Plaintiff has flied a Complaint for Divorce requesting that the Court grant a divorce for Irretrievable Breakdown of the Marriage lB. The Complaint is on file at the Court. An Automatic Restraining Order has been entered in this matter preventing you from taking any action which would negatively impact the current financial status of either party. SEE Supplemental Probate Court Rule 411. You are hereby summoned and required to serve upon Nicole K. Draper, 122 Harrison Avenue, Woburn, MA 01801 your answer, if any, on or before July 7, 2015. If you fail to do so, the court will proceed to the hearing and adjudication of this action. You are also required to file a copy of your answer, if any, in the office of the Register of this Court. WITNESS, HON. EDWARD R DONNELLY, JR., First Justice of this Court. Date: May 21, 2015 Tara E. DeCristofaro, Register of Probate Run date: 6/5/15