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Page 12 POST-GAZETTE, JULY 3, 2015 11 Ray rron' Ladies! Ladies/ Read carefully High heels are glorified in advertising and popular culture. But platform pumps, stilettos, or strappy sandals not only make your feet and ankles ache -- they may send you to the hospital, a new University of Alabama study has found. Injuries involving high- heeled shoes doubled between 2002 and 2012, with heel wearers sustaining more than 123,355 heels-related mishaps -- including 3,294 requiring a trip to the emer- gency room. Nearly half of these incidents occurred at home. Most of the women suf- .fered sprained ankles and feet, but 19 per- cent broke a bone. Some also hurt their knees, shoulders, or head. High heels also negatively affect stride, balance, and range of foot motion, creating chronic problems. "Although high-heeled shoes might be styl- ish," study lead author Gerald McGwin tells MedicaIDaily.com, "it would be worthwhile to understand the risks." Gee, speaking of feet, Marilyn Monroe had six toes on her left foot. More healthy advice. If you work at a desk, you should get up on your feet for at least two hours a day to avoid the serious health consequences of prolonged sitting, a panel of scientists has recommended. The aver- age office worker sits for 10-hours a day, and then heads home to spend the evening glued to a television or computer screen. A growing body of research has found that hours of sitting trigger a destructive chain reaction in the body, slowing metabolism, altering hormones, raising cholesterol, and weakening muscles. Over time, the result is heightened risk of diabetes, cardiovas- cular disease, weight gain, cancer, and a shortened life. Scientists say, in fact, that prolonged sitting does as much health dam- age as smoking cigarettes. And the nega- tive effects of eight to ten hours at a desk can't be undone by exercising before or af- terward. But British researchers have found that getting up for short breaks throughout the day can protect desk jockeys' bodies from the effects of sitting. Researcher Gavin Bra- dley tells The Washington Post that the key is to avoid sitting for more than 30-minutes at a time. He advises "taking your calls standing; walking around; pacing; hold- ing standing meetings;'walking over to a colleague's desk instead of sending an email; and using the stairs instead of the elevator. Eventually, Bradley says, people should aim to increase their standing time from two to four hours. "However, you do it the point is to just get off your rear end." Time for me to get up and walk, walk, walk. As the retired lawyer Peter Beatrice of Swampscott will tell you, although the United States has just 5 percent of the world's population, it has the most of the world's lawyers -- 70 percent, in fact. The American Bar Association estimated that in the year 2000, the U.S. had one mil- lion lawyers. Compared to other countries, the United States also has the most per capita lawyers. It's difficult to tell who gets the most plea- sure out of marriage. The preacher who ties the knot, or the lawyer who severs it. Pay attention! A nationally recognized fifth-grade teacher in Los Angeles was sus- pended after telling his students that if they didn't raise enough money for the annual Shakespeare play, they might have to per- form naked, like the king in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. "We over-react to every, thing," said Rafe Esquith, a winner of the National Medal of Arts. "That's the American way." The astute Barbra D'Amico, says, "You can't blame nudists for being the way they are. They were born that way!" The brainy Christina Quinlan of Windham, New Hampshire, says, "One thing about nud- ists -- you can't pin anything on them." Did you hear what they were saying? Well, Winnipeg residents overheard an X-rated conversation between two police helicopter pilots hovering above their houses because the officers had forgotten to turn off the aircraft's PA system. Proprio Stronzo says one of the troubles with small talk is that it usually comes in large doses. As the I 0 0 0 great Rosalie Cunio of Waltham would say, the real art of conversation is not only say- ing the right thing in the right place, but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempt- ing moment. Carlo Scostumato thinks women have one main topic of conversation -- how thin they used to be, or how thin they're gonna be. Eighth-graders graduating from a Manhat- tan middle school were given diplomas from the New York City "Departmemt" of Educa- tion. "It didn't take me very long to notice the typo," one parent said. Dear reader, did you catch the typo? According to our noted musicologist, Al Natale, on a Hollywood Squares program, Joey Bishop was asked to name the various performers who had played in different ver- sions of "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" through- out the years. After telling the names of the stars in the first two versions of the film, Bishop concluded with: " ... and in 1932, Spencer Tracy did it with Ingrid Bergman." On What's My Line, Arlene Francis asked the mystery guest if he was a male. Blind- folded guest panelist, Vincent Price, after hearing the guest's voice, chimed in, "All male from stem to stern!" For the record, Vincent Price passed away in 1993 at the age of 82 of lung cancer at his home in Hollywood Hills, California. Vincent Price was cremated. A Good Samaritan proved more of a hin- drance than a help when his roadside res- cue attempt went horribly wrong. Police said Christopher Ratcliffe had stopped at a gas station in upstate New York when he saw a man whose foot had become trapped between his riding lawn mower and a steep embank- ment. Ratcliffe, 31, tied a rope from the mower to his SUV, but accidentally drove forward instead of back, pushing the trapped man and the mower over the 12-foot bank. The mower landed on the man, causing mi- nor injuries. Ratcliffe was charged with driv- ing an uninsured, uninspected, and unreg- istered vehicle. For the record, the first woman to run for national office was Geraldine Ferraro, who was the Democratic candidate for vice presi- dent in 1984. Mrs. Ferraro also served in Congress, representing a district in Queens, New York, from 1979 to 1985. Another Ital- ian-American woman trailblazer Ella T. Grasso of Connecticut. Mrs. Grasso was the first Italian-American woman elected to Congress. She served until 1975 when she was elected governor of Connecticut She brought the state out of debt, personally or- ganized a massive relief effort during the 1978 blizzard, and created an "open govern- ment," which gave ordinary citizens easier access to public records. Ella Grasso died of cancer in 1981 at age 62. And Rosie the Riveter, who represented the millions of American women who took men's places in factories during World War II, was Rosie Bonavita of Long Island, New York. Yes, she was an Italian-American. And Celeste Lizio, who came to America during the 1930s and opened a restaurant with her husband in Chicago, founded Mama Celeste's Pizza, a line of frozen Italian foods that she later s old to Quaker Oats. And one more time! Fairleigh Dickinson University was co- founded by the late Sylvia (Sally) Scarmelli and her husband, Peter Sammartino. They established the New Jersey liberal arts col- lege in 1942. On this date, July 3,a, actor Tom Cruise celebrates a birthday. Cruise was born in 1962. And on this date in 1986, U.S. singer Rudy Vallee passed away. And on July 4, 1776, The Declaration of Independence was ap- proved by Congress. "We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with cer- tain unalienable rights, that among these are Life. Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness. AMERICA IS A BEAUTIFUL ITALIAN NAME Recipes from the llc rn el d by Vita Orlando Sinopo[i COPYRIGHT, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED NONNA MARY'S FISH CAKES 1 pound of cod or haddock fillet 3 large or 4 small potatoes I tablespoon grated Romano cheese 2 tablespoons chopped parsley 2 1/2 tablespoons butter or margarine I egg, beaten I four-quart pan Medium-size Teflon skillet 1/4 cup cooking oil I/4 cup dried bread crumbs (optional) Peel, cut and wash potatoes. Cover potatoes with water in the four-quart pan and bring to a boil. Boil for fifteen minutes. Meanwhile, remove all skin and bones from fish. Add cleaned fish to boiling potatoes. (If desired, fish may be boiled separately.) Boil fish and potatoes slowly for about ten to twelve minutes. When potatoes and fish are cooked, drain contents in colander for a few minutes. While still warm, place potatoes and fish in a bowl with butter and salt to taste. Add grated Romano cheese, parsley, and beaten egg. Stir and mix well. If mixture is too soft, add some bread crumbs to absorb any extra liquid. Store covered in refrig- erator to cool. Mixture is easier to shape into fiat fish cakes when cool. SHAPING: Take a FULL tablespoon of mixture in hand and shape like a flattened meatball. Heat oil in skillet. Fry fish cakes until golden brown. Turn over with spatula to brown on other side. Then remove from skillet and place in paper plate to absorb excess oil. OPTIONAL: For those who prefer baked food, place the fish cake mixture in a lightly oil-sprayed baking dish. After covering the baking dish with aluminum foil, place it in a preheated 350F oven to bake for about twenty minutes. Remove cover to lightly brown top before serving. Serve with vegetable of choice or salad. * What's Happening to America (Continued from Page 3) where the marble statute was attacked by vandals who spray painted red paint sym- bolizing, I assume, all the blood on his hands. Written on the other side of the stat- ute in black paint is "Black Lives Matter." Today it seems the only thing that matters is all things liberal. The mobs are running amok and getting support from our weak lead- ers and complicit media. As we get ready to celebrate the Fourth of July, I worry for America's future. I worry for our First Amendment guar- antees of free speech, free press and the rest. Assaulting the Columbus statute is a big deal because it speaks to a new America inching its way into the cul- ture of our times. America's democratic republic is en- dangered and we need to work together in keeping America the home of the brave and land of the free. To keep America open to dis- sent from both left and right. To value our diversity rather than demand political pro- gressive purism. God bless America and Happy Birthday to America, which is all of us. LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Middlesex Division 208 Cambridge Street East Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI15P3280EA Estate of ESTELLA MARTINEZ Date of Death September 15, 2007 INFORMAL PROBATE PUBLICATION NOTICE To all persons interested in the above captioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner Melissa Gibson of Whitney,'rx. Melissa Gibson of Whitney, TX has been informally appointed as the Personal Repre- sentative of the estate to serve without surety on the bend. The estate is being administered under informal procedure by the Personal Represen- tative under the Massachusetts Uniform Pro- bate Code without supervision by the Court. inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but interested parties are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. Interested parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute formal proceedings and to obtain orders terminating or restricting the powers of Per- serial Representatives appointed under infor- mal procedure. A copy of the Petition and Will, if any, can be obtained from the Petitioner. Run date: 7/3/15 Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Middlesex Division 208 Cambridge Street East Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI15P3294EA Estate of MILDRED L. COOK Date of Death July 31, 2012 INFORMAL PROBATE PUBLICATION NOTICE To all persons interested in the above captioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner Kenya Cook of Moundville, AL. Kenya Cook of Moundville, AL has been informally appointed as the Personal Repre- sentative of the estate to serve without surety on the bend. The estate is being administered under informal procedure by the Personal Represen- tative under the Massachusetts Uniform Pro- bate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but interested parties are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. Interested parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute formal proceedings and to obtain orders terminating or restricting the powers of Per- sonal Representatives appointed under infor- mal procedure. A copy of the Petition and Will, it any, can be obtained from the Petitioner. Run(late: 7/3/15 WWW.BOSTONPOSTGAZETTE.COM