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POST-GAZETTE, OCTOBER 23, 2015 Page 13 gt n a Babb onno by John Christoforo A Nostalgic Remembrance We're in the middle of football season. I'm basically a baseball fan, but will watch and enjoy a Patriot's game. My sons have asked me why I didn't play foot- ball in high school. I have given them excuses: I had to work at the Seville Theater, I had too much home work, and the practice field was too far away from East Boston. These were all good and viable ex- cuses, but there was another reason that I didn't share with my sons. I was thrown off the English High School football team by Bill Stuart, the head coach, because of carrying two duffle bags, one with my equip- ment and the other with sub- marine sandwiches. The problem started out when I was a sophomore at EHS. I had graduated from the Joseph H. Barnes Junior High School when it was the middle school for my neighborhood. While attending the school I discov- ered that the cafeteria food was an affront to my taste buds. My only recourse was to bring food from home, and most of us with last names ending in vowels did just that. When I got to English High, I discovered that their caf- eteria food was worse than what I had experienced at the Barnes. I brought my own lunch in a brown bag to counter this, but became aware that even the "American kids" were complain- ing about the lack of quality and taste of the school's cafeteria food. I decided to go into business for myself and save the taste buds of my classmates. On the way home, I stopped at Santoro's Submarine Shop in Central Square, East Boston. The sub shop was within walk- ing distance of the Seville Theater, and I often bought my lunch there. American subs were forty cents and Italian subs were sixty cents. {this was a long time ago}. I knew the manager and day crew as they often waited on me or my fellow ush- ers from the theater. I worked out a deal through the manager. If I were to buy 100 subs at a time, I could receive a discount. American subs would cost me 25 cents instead of 40, and Ital- ian, 45 cents instead of 60. Do- ing a little math and being a bit greedy, I figured that if I were to buy 100 subs and doubled the price to my fellow students, I could make a tidy profit every time I supplied them with good food. I had made it as an offensive and defensive tackle on the jun- ior varsity squad and was issued a duffle bag and all of the equip- ment and the uniform which would able me to represent En- glish High School. A day or two later, I asked the coach for an- other duffle bag, claiming mine smelled badly and had holes in several locations. Without any problem, I was issued a second bag. This one was for Santoro subs, not football equipment. The arrangements would be made the day before and early the next morning, someone would be at the sub shop with the 100 subs for me to pick up. At first I concentrated on the American subs. One hundred of them would cost me 25 dollars. At school, I sold them out of my duffle bag for 50 cents apiece, making 100% profit on every one. I could only do this during my lunch time, but there were three lunches at English in those days. I found two enter- prising individuals who would sell the subs during their lunches and gave them $5.00 each for helping me out. If there were any subs left over, I would sell them at foot- ball practice and never headed home with any leftovers. After about a week of conducting business out of a football duffle bag, Dad and Babbononno heard me on the phone with a friend. Our conversation was about me bragging about my new business. After I hung up, I was grilled by both my father and grandfather about my ille- gal food supply. They were skep- tical of the goings on and were worried about the outcome. They didn't have to wait long. About a month later, I was called to the front office to speak with the principal. Mr. Mclnerney had been a naval officer and had me stand at attention while being interrogated about my underground business. He commented on how the lunch profits had reduced due to my sandwich selling. I told him that the food was so bad that every- one was complaining and I decided to do something about it. He complimented me on operating on the behalf of the welfare of my fellow students, but I was "busted," as he put it. That afternoon, I was dropped from the football team and had to turn in my duffle bag that contained my uniform and equipment. I was also told to return the second duffle bag that I used to transport the I00 submarine sandwiches that helped put English High School's cafeteria in the red. After a few days, I was called back to the principal's office. I was told that the administration had been lenient with me by not suspending me from school, but why was I still selling subs to my fellow students. I told the principal that I was out of busi- ness and had no idea who had picked up my idea. The principal, the assistant principal and the head of guid- ance all patrolled the three lunches for the next few days until the culprit was caught. This time they suspended the Loved Ones ' :, .+ ,:,:::+++~: The Post-Gazette accepts memorials throughout the year Please call 617-227-8929 , individual. I guess I was lucky. If I ever went home and told my father, Babbononno or the la- dies in my family that I had been suspended, I might not have lived to tell about it. Even though I was out of busi- ness and off the football team, I believed in self preservation, even at an early age. I would walk to Central Square early in the morning, buy a half dozen subs, put them in a large lunch bag, and then put the lunch bag in my gym bag, and have a tasty lunch for myself and any of my close friends (especially from East Boston and the North End) who didn't want to deal with the horrid school food that English High's cafeteria served us. I never went back to playing football. I hated to disappoint Dad, as this was his favorite sport. I, on the other hand, loved {and still do) the game of baseball. I am a dyed-in-the- wool Red Sox fan. Because I worked at the Seville Theater, I couldn't join English's baseball squad. I did play for the CYO League and the American Legion League in East Boston. I also played in college for four years, and was good enough to try out for Cincinnati's minor league teams. Thanks to Coach Sullivan at Boston State, I got a shot at pro baseball. I was good, but there were three guys in front of me who were great: Dave Concepcion, Joe Gordon and Pete Rose. I was good; they were great. That was it. Playing Double A ball paid $50 a game. I figured I could make more money playing bass than base- ball and stuck with music for the next 50 odd years. Years later, I found out why I didn't get suspended from English High when I was caught trying to put the cafeteria out of business. Dad was an adminis- trator in the Boston School Department during the day and I think that enabled me to be saved. Who knows; it was a long time ago. GOD BLESS AMERICA LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The THSI Court Probate and Family Court Middlesex Division 208 Cambridge Street East Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 76vJ8oo Docket No. MII5P4S62EA Estate of LOUISE A. HOLMES Date of Death August 12, 2012 INFORMAL PROBATE PUBUCATION NOTICE To all persons interested in the above captioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner Hed~ Holmes, Sr. of EIIzabuth, NJ. Herbert Holmes, Sr. of Bizabath, NJ has been informally appointed as the Personal Rep- resentative of the estate to serve without surety on the bond. The estate is being administered under informal procedure by the Personal Represen- tative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate without supervision by the Court. Inven- tory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but interested parties are en- Wed to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. Interested parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute formal proceed- ings and to obtain orders terminating or restrict- ing the powers of Personal Representatives appointed under informal procedure. A copy of the Petition and Will, if any, can be obtained from the Pe~oner. Run date 10/23/15 This and That (Continued from Page 8) were rewarded with stolen Ger- man loot in exchange for sanc- tuary. It's no less despicable, but it confirms that Per6n was a man driven by business first. Para- doxically, Per6n appointed more Jews in office than any other Latin American leader before him (to put this in perspective, how- ever, Argentina had a larger Jew- ish population than the rest of South America). Argentina's Jew- ish community has spoken well of him. Ezequiel Zabotinsky, president of the Jewish-Peronist Organizacion Israelita Argentina, From General to President, few said of the leader, "When I real- know who the real Per6n was. ized that Per6n, contrary to pre- foreign (usually American), in- vious governments, gave Jewish vestments. Among these was a citizens access to public office, grant of $60 million to a variety I began to change my way of of American corporations to build thinking about Argentine poll- twenty two power plants in tics." Even U.S. Ambassador Argentina. George S. Messersmith observed, These ventures had the poten- "There is not as much social dis- tial for great economic growth in crimination against Jews here as Argentina and, had he not let there is right in New York or in greed blind his progress, Frondizl most places at home." may have given birth of a stron- Given the shameful aid to war ger economy than Per6n did. in- criminals he provided, it's shock- deed, many good things came out ing to learn about other things of his business model, including Per6n and Evita did, including Standard Oil's joint venture in supporting the formation of or- Patagonia. But steel and meat ganizations such as the New production were suffering lead- Zion, the Argentine-Jewish Insti- ing to inflation, which in turn cre- tute of Culture and Information, ated poor working conditions and and Argentine-lsraeli Chamber of strikes in major cities llke Buenos Commerce. In addition, he signed Aires. a commerce agreement with Is- Per6n's business model is a far rael (Argentina was the first Latin cry from Mussolini's fascism and American country to recognize veers closely into socialism. Israel as a state), and through Per6n, however, avoided easy the Eva Per6n Foundation, sent political labels. If so, that's just humanitarian aid to Israel. one more example of what makes So what to make of Juan Per6n Juan Per6n such a fascinating and who was he really as a figure. His politics and even ide- leader? His long history with Ar- ology was full of contradictions, gentina is full of contradictions, making him one of history's most diverse public opinions, and enigmatic figures and one of the above all, misconceptions born most complicated to understand, out of these things. He is associ- The one incontrovertible blotch ated with fascism, but his to his legacy is his sheltering of policies had more in common Nazi war criminals after the war. with the Populist movement. His Argentina became the favored legacy is tainted by his aid of Nazi sanctuary for many of Hitler's war criminals, and yet he did men due in large part to Per6n's more for the Jewish community avowed offering of protection, than any other Latin American Among the big fish to flee were leader. The legacy of Juan Adolf Eichmann and Josef Domingo Per6n is one with Mengele. And yet, not only was no easy answers but, for this Per6n not an anti-Semite, butac- reason, it's all the more impor- tually seemed to have a strong tant that he is studied with tie toArgenflna's Jewish commu- far greater insight than has been nity. indeed, his deal with former offered. He was a man of many Nazis is recently appearing to be faces, many ideas, and with more ofabusinessdealinwhich a legacy of many different he (along with his wife Evita), opinions. LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The'l~si Court Probate and Family Court Middlesex Division 208 Cambridge Street East Cambddge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI15P4880EA Estate of DREWEY ALLEN MAYS Date of Death August 18, 2011 INFORMAL PROBATE PUBLICATION NOTICE To all persons interested in the above captioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner Allen B. Mays of Allen, TX, a Will has been admitted to informal probate. Allen B. Meys of Allen, TX has been infor- , really appofnfed as the Personal Reprssenta: live of the estate to serve without surety on the bond. The estate is being administered under informal procedure by the Personal Represen- tative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inven- tory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but interested parties are en- titled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. Interested parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute formal proceed- ings and to obtain orders terminating or restrict- ing the powers of Personal Representatives appointed under informal procedure. A copy of the Petition and Will, if any, can be obtained from the Petitioner. Run date 10/23/15 LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Middlesex Division 208 Cambridge Street East Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-51100 Docket No. MI15PS002EA Estate of HERBERT O'DELL SMITH, JR. Date of Doeth Decembar 9, 2013 INFORMAL PROBATE PUBLICATION NOTICE To all persons interested in the above captioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner Phyllb E. Smith of Durham, NC. Phyllis E. Smith of Durham, NC has been informally appointed as the Personal Represen- tative of the estate to serve without surety on the bond. The estate is being administered under informal procedure by the Personal Represen- ta~e under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inven- tory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but interested parties are en- titled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can pe~on ! the Court in any matter ratstJng to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. Interested parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute formal proceed- ings and to obtain orders terminating or restrict- ing the powers of Personal Representatives appointed under informal procedure. A copy of the Petition and Will, if any, can be obtained from the Petitioner. Run date 10/23/15