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Page 4 POST-GAZETTE, NOVEMBER 21,2014 The Food That Makes the Feast by Ally Di Censo Symynkywicz What is it about the win- the crust of my cheesecake, __- ter that makes us turn to and will eat' them out of the by $al Gzarratam feasts of delicious food? Ev- erywhere I turn, I see abun- dant reminders of Thanks- giving, from cornhusks decorating lampposts to over- filled supermarkets. Maga- zines feature succulent, briny turkeys on their cov- ers. Slices of pumpkin pie, replete with a dollop of whipped cream, make their way towards tables across the nation. Cooks debate over what exactly consti- tutes a perfect stuffing, or whether cranberry sauce should be jellied or more like a chutney. Yes, with Thanksgiving approaching, my mind invariably turns to the delectable dishes that characterize the holiday. This is the time of year, af- ter all, when we need that extra sustenance that feast- ing can provide. The nights are darker and the air is chill, with cloudy skies that promise snowflakes. Feasts like Thanksgiving provide us with the opportunity to honor the harvest of the season that just ended, and to gather with our family and friends to form a barrier against the cold. This Thanksgiving, I will honor my love for cook- ing while continuing to be thankful for the loved ones that surround me. Cooking has always formed an integral part of my family life. My mother is famous for several recipes: her potato croquettes, which have a crispy exterior and are soft like mashed pota- toes on the inside; her orecchiette with broccoli rabe and just enough crushed red pepper flakes to give a subtle kick. She learned cooking from her grandmother, my Nonna, who still keeps stacks of worn cookbooks with hand- written recipes. Within those cookbooks, I find much loved Italian recipes like struffu//, or small honey balls for Christmas, and taralli, pretzel-like biscuits flavored with fennel. Though I grew up watching both my mother and grandmother cook, I did not develop my own true pas- sion for the kitchen until college. That was when I started collecting issues of Taste of Home magazine and marveling over the pictures and stories that accompa- nied each recipe. Nowadays, I am always making some- thing, and my true love is baking. I believe that my kitchen, with its warm yellow light and its small nooks and crannies, forms the coziest space to be in the dark and rainy evenings of late fall. When I pull a cake or a batch of cookies from the oven, the warmth envelopes me like a hug. During the autumn, these metaphorical hugs smell like the fruit of the harvest -- rich pumpkin, tangy apples, zesty spices. Thanksgiving is the su- preme food holiday of the year, and I put my cooking hobby into full use. Everyone in my family contributes a dish to Thanksgiving feast, and my two contributes are a pumpkin swirl cheese- cake with a gingersnap crust and a salad with apples, cranberries and blue cheese. What makes the food so special, however, are the stories behind each recipe. Whenever I see my mother's sweet potato casse- role with a pecan-brown sugar topping, I remember how we pored over many recipes in magazines and online before we found the perfect one. Spaghetti re- minds me of my paternal grandmother making the noodles on an old-fashioned crank instrument known as la chitarra, popular in her home region of Abruzzi in Italy. My husband loves the gingersnap cookies that form Thanksgiving vs. the Big (Continued from Page 1) wrote to Kmart expressing her discontent with the com- pany over their planned 6:00 am Thanksgiving Day open- ing because her mother, who has been a long-time em- ployee of the retail conglom- erate would miss the day with her family. They re- sponded by saying they ap- preciate her letter, but that her mother knows her schedule and worked with her superiors to reach a mutually agreed upon shift. From the retailer's side, they are competing with the internet and other large companies for every last con- sumer dollar. Whether they offer extended hours, door buster sales or Black Friday specials that last for days, each is trying to one up the other where the workers, Box Company who are compensated with time and a half on legal holi- days, are sacrificing their family time. The bottom line: is it worth it? Does that extra day of shopping really make that much of a differ- ence? Since all large com- panies feature online shop- ping, if a consumer wants so desperately to purchase that new television on Thanks- giving while the gravy sim- mers they can do so from the comfort of their home with- out having to schlep to a mall. If all the large corporations decided together to not open on Thanksgiving would they really worry about a de- crease in sales for that one day?. I think not since their competitor was also enjoying time around the table with their family. box before I remind him to save some. Meanwhile, my aunt's appropriately named Pilgrim Pie, an apple cake with a thick crust, has gar- nered somewhat of a cult following in my family. It truly is the family atmo- sphere that makes these foods so memorable. If I had a table with all of these deli- cious treats, but no one to share them with, any sense of magic would be lost. The food at Thanksgiving sym- bolizes so much more than a meal -- it is the laughter and funny anecdotes shared around the table, it is the passing of tradition from one generation to the next. This Thanksgiving, I plan to be extra grateful for the blessings in my life: the abil- ity to enjoy food, the loving family that surrounds me. So many people out there will be hungry and alone this holiday, and they deserve our help. Donate food items or coats to a charity, and spread the true meaning of the holiday to those in need. As winter descends upon us and early nights cloak the world, everyone should have the opportunity to relish the security of a safe home, a special meal, and a network of support. Each ingredient I put into a dish this Thanks- giving will be a reminder of the joy and cheer that characterizes the holiday season, traits which we should be mindful to pass along as the year goes on. So on Thanksgiving, enjoy your feast and count each and every one of your bless- ings, for they are truly the nourishment that bolsters this holiday. Happy Thanksgiving! Ally Di Censo Symynkywicz is a Graduate Student in History at the University of Massachusetts Boston. She appreciates any comments and suggestions about Italian holidays and folklore at adicenso89@gmail.com. LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Middlesex Probate and Family Court 208 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA 02141 Docket No. MII4D3845DR DIVORCE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION AND MAILING PIERRE M. DORICENT VS. RENETTE DESSOURCES To the Defendant: The Plaintiff has filed a Complaint for Divorce requesting that the Court grant a divorce for Irretrievable Breakdown of the Marriage 18. The Complaint is on file at the Court. An Automatic Restraining Order has been entered in this matter preventing you from taking any action which would negatively impact the current financial status of either party. SEE Supplemental Probate Court Rule 411. You are hereby summoned and required to serve upen Pierre M. Dodcent, 3 Brcedway, Malden, MA 02148 your answer, if any, on or before December 15, 2014. If you fail to do so the court will proceed to the hearing and adjudication of this action. You are also requ red to file a copy of your answer, if any, in the office of the Register of this Court. WITNESS, HON. EDWARD F. DONNELL Y, JR., First Justice of this Court Date: November 3, 2014 Tare E. DeCristofaro, Register of Probate Run date: 11/21/14 The Cocoanut Grove Remembered, Part I The Cocoanut Grove was a popular nightspot in Boston's Theatre District when World War II began for America on December 7, 1941. During Prohibition it was turned into a speakeasy. The Cocoanut Grove had a tropical ambiance filled with palm trees, bamboo covered the walls and satin hid the plas- terboard ceilings. "The exotic but artificial decor belied the building's origins as a garage and warehouse," stated Mary Ellen Doone in a piece she wrote in the Massachusetts Re- port on Nursing (March 2014). On the night of November 28, 1942 over 1,000 gathered inside, despite the seating capac- ity being 400. In hindsight, it was a recipe for a disaster that soon happened. The place was packed with the usual Saturday night crowd, members of the military and football fans who went over to the club from Fenway Park after Holy Cross beat up Boston College 52-12 earlier in the day. I dare say, had Boston College won, you might have seen even more football fans celebrat- ing the game. It was looking like a great evening as couples were danc- ing in the ballroom, dining in the restaurant and drinking downstairs in the Melody Lounge. Everyone was waiting for the ten o'clock show to begin. They were listening to a piano player banging out "Bell Bottom Trousers" on the ivory, when at about 10:15 pm, fire broke out. The fire is officially blamed on faulty electrical wiring and the fabrics used to create the illusion of paradise. For years a waiter was blamed for light- ing a match, but he wasn't to blame for the inferno that happened. The satin ceiling allegedly ignited. Flames shot up the wails and the fumes from the fabrics took over the air quickly, then the fire raced up the stairway into the dining area. Within minutes the whole place was ablaze. The flames kept seeking more oxygen to stay alive as customers started a panic run for the exits. The main exit was a revolving door to Piedmont Street. Although not engulfed, bodies started piling up as everyone tried to revolve the doors from both sides. Also adding to this horror was the fact that many exits were chained or opened inward, trapping the crowd. (Part II next week) LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Middlesex Division 208 Cambridge Street East Cambridge, MA 02141 (017) 76-.00 Docket No. MI14P5853EA Estate of ELWOOD ALEXANDER BUERO Also Know As AL BUERO Date of Death November 8, 2008 INFORMAL PROBATE PUBLICATION NOTICE To all persons interested in the above captioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner Unda Buero of Victondlle, CA. Unde Buero of Vlctorvllle, CA has been informally appointed as the Personal Repre- sentative of the estate to serve without surety on the bond. The estate is being administered under informal procedure by the Personal Represen- tative under the Massachusetts Uniform Pro- bate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but interested parties are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. Interested parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute formal proceedings and to obtain orders terminating or restdcting the powers of Per- sonal Representatives appointed under infor- mal procedure. A copy of the Petition and Will, if any, can be obtained from the Petitioner. Run date: 11/21/14 LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate end Family Court Middlesex Division 208 Cambridge Street East Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI14FS040EA Estate of KENNETH PETER CABANA Date of Death July 10, 2010 INFORMAL PROBATE PUBLICATION NOTICE To all persons interested in the above captioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner Unde Roberts of Cranston, RI. Uncle Roberts of Cranston, RI has been informally appointed as the Personal Repre- sentative of the estate to serve without surety on the bond. The estate is being administered under informal procedure by the Personal Represen- taifve under the Massachusetts Uniform Pro- bate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but interested parties are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. Interested parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute formal proceedings and to obtain orders terminating or restricting the powers of Per- sonal Representatives appointed under infor- mal procedure. A copy of the Petition and Witl, if any, can be obtained from the Petitioner. Run date: 11/21/14 Page 4 POST-GAZETTE, NOVEMBER 21,2014 The Food That Makes the Feast by Ally Di Censo Symynkywicz What is it about the win- the crust of my cheesecake, __- ter that makes us turn to and will eat' them out of the by $al Gzarratam feasts of delicious food? Ev- erywhere I turn, I see abun- dant reminders of Thanks- giving, from cornhusks decorating lampposts to over- filled supermarkets. Maga- zines feature succulent, briny turkeys on their cov- ers. Slices of pumpkin pie, replete with a dollop of whipped cream, make their way towards tables across the nation. Cooks debate over what exactly consti- tutes a perfect stuffing, or whether cranberry sauce should be jellied or more like a chutney. Yes, with Thanksgiving approaching, my mind invariably turns to the delectable dishes that characterize the holiday. This is the time of year, af- ter all, when we need that extra sustenance that feast- ing can provide. The nights are darker and the air is chill, with cloudy skies that promise snowflakes. Feasts like Thanksgiving provide us with the opportunity to honor the harvest of the season that just ended, and to gather with our family and friends to form a barrier against the cold. This Thanksgiving, I will honor my love for cook- ing while continuing to be thankful for the loved ones that surround me. Cooking has always formed an integral part of my family life. My mother is famous for several recipes: her potato croquettes, which have a crispy exterior and are soft like mashed pota- toes on the inside; her orecchiette with broccoli rabe and just enough crushed red pepper flakes to give a subtle kick. She learned cooking from her grandmother, my Nonna, who still keeps stacks of worn cookbooks with hand- written recipes. Within those cookbooks, I find much loved Italian recipes like struffu//, or small honey balls for Christmas, and taralli, pretzel-like biscuits flavored with fennel. Though I grew up watching both my mother and grandmother cook, I did not develop my own true pas- sion for the kitchen until college. That was when I started collecting issues of Taste of Home magazine and marveling over the pictures and stories that accompa- nied each recipe. Nowadays, I am always making some- thing, and my true love is baking. I believe that my kitchen, with its warm yellow light and its small nooks and crannies, forms the coziest space to be in the dark and rainy evenings of late fall. When I pull a cake or a batch of cookies from the oven, the warmth envelopes me like a hug. During the autumn, these metaphorical hugs smell like the fruit of the harvest -- rich pumpkin, tangy apples, zesty spices. Thanksgiving is the su- preme food holiday of the year, and I put my cooking hobby into full use. Everyone in my family contributes a dish to Thanksgiving feast, and my two contributes are a pumpkin swirl cheese- cake with a gingersnap crust and a salad with apples, cranberries and blue cheese. What makes the food so special, however, are the stories behind each recipe. Whenever I see my mother's sweet potato casse- role with a pecan-brown sugar topping, I remember how we pored over many recipes in magazines and online before we found the perfect one. Spaghetti re- minds me of my paternal grandmother making the noodles on an old-fashioned crank instrument known as la chitarra, popular in her home region of Abruzzi in Italy. My husband loves the gingersnap cookies that form Thanksgiving vs. the Big (Continued from Page 1) wrote to Kmart expressing her discontent with the com- pany over their planned 6:00 am Thanksgiving Day open- ing because her mother, who has been a long-time em- ployee of the retail conglom- erate would miss the day with her family. They re- sponded by saying they ap- preciate her letter, but that her mother knows her schedule and worked with her superiors to reach a mutually agreed upon shift. From the retailer's side, they are competing with the internet and other large companies for every last con- sumer dollar. Whether they offer extended hours, door buster sales or Black Friday specials that last for days, each is trying to one up the other where the workers, Box Company who are compensated with time and a half on legal holi- days, are sacrificing their family time. The bottom line: is it worth it? Does that extra day of shopping really make that much of a differ- ence? Since all large com- panies feature online shop- ping, if a consumer wants so desperately to purchase that new television on Thanks- giving while the gravy sim- mers they can do so from the comfort of their home with- out having to schlep to a mall. If all the large corporations decided together to not open on Thanksgiving would they really worry about a de- crease in sales for that one day?. I think not since their competitor was also enjoying time around the table with their family. box before I remind him to save some. Meanwhile, my aunt's appropriately named Pilgrim Pie, an apple cake with a thick crust, has gar- nered somewhat of a cult following in my family. It truly is the family atmo- sphere that makes these foods so memorable. If I had a table with all of these deli- cious treats, but no one to share them with, any sense of magic would be lost. The food at Thanksgiving sym- bolizes so much more than a meal -- it is the laughter and funny anecdotes shared around the table, it is the passing of tradition from one generation to the next. This Thanksgiving, I plan to be extra grateful for the blessings in my life: the abil- ity to enjoy food, the loving family that surrounds me. So many people out there will be hungry and alone this holiday, and they deserve our help. Donate food items or coats to a charity, and spread the true meaning of the holiday to those in need. As winter descends upon us and early nights cloak the world, everyone should have the opportunity to relish the security of a safe home, a special meal, and a network of support. Each ingredient I put into a dish this Thanks- giving will be a reminder of the joy and cheer that characterizes the holiday season, traits which we should be mindful to pass along as the year goes on. So on Thanksgiving, enjoy your feast and count each and every one of your bless- ings, for they are truly the nourishment that bolsters this holiday. Happy Thanksgiving! Ally Di Censo Symynkywicz is a Graduate Student in History at the University of Massachusetts Boston. She appreciates any comments and suggestions about Italian holidays and folklore at adicenso89@gmail.com. LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Middlesex Probate and Family Court 208 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA 02141 Docket No. MII4D3845DR DIVORCE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION AND MAILING PIERRE M. DORICENT VS. RENETTE DESSOURCES To the Defendant: The Plaintiff has filed a Complaint for Divorce requesting that the Court grant a divorce for Irretrievable Breakdown of the Marriage 18. The Complaint is on file at the Court. An Automatic Restraining Order has been entered in this matter preventing you from taking any action which would negatively impact the current financial status of either party. SEE Supplemental Probate Court Rule 411. You are hereby summoned and required to serve upen Pierre M. Dodcent, 3 Brcedway, Malden, MA 02148 your answer, if any, on or before December 15, 2014. If you fail to do so the court will proceed to the hearing and adjudication of this action. You are also requ red to file a copy of your answer, if any, in the office of the Register of this Court. WITNESS, HON. EDWARD F. DONNELL Y, JR., First Justice of this Court Date: November 3, 2014 Tare E. DeCristofaro, Register of Probate Run date: 11/21/14 The Cocoanut Grove Remembered, Part I The Cocoanut Grove was a popular nightspot in Boston's Theatre District when World War II began for America on December 7, 1941. During Prohibition it was turned into a speakeasy. The Cocoanut Grove had a tropical ambiance filled with palm trees, bamboo covered the walls and satin hid the plas- terboard ceilings. "The exotic but artificial decor belied the building's origins as a garage and warehouse," stated Mary Ellen Doone in a piece she wrote in the Massachusetts Re- port on Nursing (March 2014). On the night of November 28, 1942 over 1,000 gathered inside, despite the seating capac- ity being 400. In hindsight, it was a recipe for a disaster that soon happened. The place was packed with the usual Saturday night crowd, members of the military and football fans who went over to the club from Fenway Park after Holy Cross beat up Boston College 52-12 earlier in the day. I dare say, had Boston College won, you might have seen even more football fans celebrat- ing the game. It was looking like a great evening as couples were danc- ing in the ballroom, dining in the restaurant and drinking downstairs in the Melody Lounge. Everyone was waiting for the ten o'clock show to begin. They were listening to a piano player banging out "Bell Bottom Trousers" on the ivory, when at about 10:15 pm, fire broke out. The fire is officially blamed on faulty electrical wiring and the fabrics used to create the illusion of paradise. For years a waiter was blamed for light- ing a match, but he wasn't to blame for the inferno that happened. The satin ceiling allegedly ignited. Flames shot up the wails and the fumes from the fabrics took over the air quickly, then the fire raced up the stairway into the dining area. Within minutes the whole place was ablaze. The flames kept seeking more oxygen to stay alive as customers started a panic run for the exits. The main exit was a revolving door to Piedmont Street. Although not engulfed, bodies started piling up as everyone tried to revolve the doors from both sides. Also adding to this horror was the fact that many exits were chained or opened inward, trapping the crowd. (Part II next week) LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Middlesex Division 208 Cambridge Street East Cambridge, MA 02141 (017) 76-.00 Docket No. MI14P5853EA Estate of ELWOOD ALEXANDER BUERO Also Know As AL BUERO Date of Death November 8, 2008 INFORMAL PROBATE PUBLICATION NOTICE To all persons interested in the above captioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner Unda Buero of Victondlle, CA. Unde Buero of Vlctorvllle, CA has been informally appointed as the Personal Repre- sentative of the estate to serve without surety on the bond. The estate is being administered under informal procedure by the Personal Represen- tative under the Massachusetts Uniform Pro- bate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but interested parties are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. Interested parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute formal proceedings and to obtain orders terminating or restdcting the powers of Per- sonal Representatives appointed under infor- mal procedure. A copy of the Petition and Will, if any, can be obtained from the Petitioner. Run date: 11/21/14 LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate end Family Court Middlesex Division 208 Cambridge Street East Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI14FS040EA Estate of KENNETH PETER CABANA Date of Death July 10, 2010 INFORMAL PROBATE PUBLICATION NOTICE To all persons interested in the above captioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner Unde Roberts of Cranston, RI. Uncle Roberts of Cranston, RI has been informally appointed as the Personal Repre- sentative of the estate to serve without surety on the bond. The estate is being administered under informal procedure by the Personal Represen- taifve under the Massachusetts Uniform Pro- bate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but interested parties are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. Interested parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute formal proceedings and to obtain orders terminating or restricting the powers of Per- sonal Representatives appointed under infor- mal procedure. A copy of the Petition and Witl, if any, can be obtained from the Petitioner. Run date: 11/21/14