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PAGE 6 POST-GAZETTE, DECEMBER 4, 2015 ALL ZAZZ by Mary N. DiZazzo "Mineral Makeup" m What is it Exactly? Ciao bella, "Mineral makeup" -- that's all I've been hearing and reading about as the new trendy way to wea_dng your makeup more natu- rally. So I'm here to give you the lowdown on it. Mineral makeup, as beauty lore has it, was a cosmetic dis- covery (purely marketable) as a 1970s aftermath of the notorious Halght-Ashbury love-ins of San Francisco. It claims to have no chemicals, preservatives, or dyes like other standard makeup. It has skin benefits since it's formulated from finely ground minerals from the earth. The main mineral ingredients are mica, zinc oxide, and titanium dioxide. These minerals-also exist in our traditional makeup. But mineral makeup doesn't have the typical skin irritants such as fragrances, binders, synthetic dyes, and preservatives. Mineral makeup is considered a lot purer and gentler for your skin. The result of using mineral makeup in its usual powder form with the proper makeup brushes boast a light, natural, long-lasting glow that simply cannot be duplicated by other types of makeup. From my eyebrows (no more pencil) to my skin and cheek color, I am a true fan. Even through my suntan the ageless glow is like no other traditional makeup has ever produced. You be the judge and try some mineral makeup today. For more info on brand names and where to go for a professional demo, call me. This is one exploding trend I'm sure glad I didn't let pass by. Buona giornata and God bless the United States of America! -- Mary DiZazzo-Trumbull Have you missed any of Mary's columns in the Post~? Read prior weeks' a,4 II That $azz" columns on her website um,'w. marij4nails.com. She is a third-generation cosmetologist and owner of Mar~j for Nails, etc. natural nailcare salon, and a Mas- sachusetts distributor of Kosmen brand rose hip oIl products. She may be contacted at (978) 470-8183. LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Suffolk Probate and Family Court 24 New Chardon Street Boston, MA 02114 (617) 788-8300 Docket No. SU15P2849EA Estate of ANTONIO J. CORREIA Also Known As ANTONIO CORREIA Date of Death March 7, 2012 CITATION ON PETITION FOR FORMAL ADJUDICATION To all interested persons: A Petition for Formal Appointment of Personal Representative has been filed by Florence Correia of Stonehem, MA request- ing that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. The Petitioner requests that Florence Correia of Stoneham, MA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond in an unsupervised administration. IMPORTANT NOTICE You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on the return day of December 24, 2015. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceed- ing. If you fail to file a timely written appear- ance and objection followed by an affidavit of objections within thirty (30) days of the return day, action may be taken without further notice to you. UNSUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE MASSACHUSETTS UNIFORM PROBATE CODE (MUPC) A Personal Representative appointed under the MUPC in an unsupervised admin- istration is not required to file an inventory or annual accounts with the Court. Persons interested in the estate are entitled to notice regarding the administration directly from the Personal Representative and may peti- tion the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including the distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, HON. JOAN P. ARMSTRONG, First Justice of this Court. Date: November 20, 2015 Felix D. Arroyo, Register of Probate Run date: 12/4/15 Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Suffolk Probate and Family Court 24 New Chardon Street Boston, MA 02114 (617) 788-8300 Docket No. SU15P2858EA Estate of CAROL A. CORREIA Also Known As CAROL CORREIA Date of Death June 23, 2015 CITATION ON PETITION FOR FORMAL ADJUDICATION To all interested persons: A Petition for Formal Adjudication of Intestacy and Appointment of Personal Representative has been filed by Florence Correia of Stoneham, MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order and for such other relief as requested in the Petition The Petitioner requests that Florence Correia of Stoneham, MA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond in an unsupervised administration. IMPORTANT NOTICE You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on the return day of December 24, 2015. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceed- ing. If you fail to file a timely written appear- ance and objection followed by an affidavit of objections within thirty (30) days of the return day, action may be taken without further notice to you. UNSUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE MASSACHUSETTS UNIFORM PROBATE CODE (MUPC) A Personal Representative appointed under the MUPC in an unsupervised admin- istration is not required to file an inventory or annual accounts with the Court. Persons interested in the estate are entitled to notice regarding the administration directly from the Personal Representative and may peti- tion the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including the distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, HON. JOAN P. ARMSTRONG, First Justice of this Court. Date: November 20, 2015 Felix D. Arroyo, Register of Probate Run date: 12/4/15 December Harry and A film by by Men of the Cloth is a love story. Yes, it is a documentary about three master Italian tailors and the different paths they took to be- come internationally celebrated, award-winning leaders in their profession. But more, it is a story of real and enduring passion for a calling, one that is possibly in danger of becoming extinct. Nino Corvato, Joe Centofanti and Checchino Fonticoli are the featured masters. Sadly, Cento- fani, the most endearing of the three, passed away last year. But not before he was able to pass along both his passion and his skills. There is hope[ The film opens with Nino Corvato back in his hometown of Ficarazzi, near Palermo in Sicily, strolling the wa- terfront and lamenting the dying of his profession. There used to be a hundred tailors in the town, but now there is only one. Corvato began ap- prenticing to a tailor when he was 7 years old, going to school un- til one, and then work- ing at the shop until nine at night. By the time he was 18, he was a frill tailor. The very first suit he made was for his father, who was so happy that he could finally get his suits for free! At 20, upon the advice of a cousin visiting from the U.S., he decided to try his fortune in America, landing at the Brooks Brothers factory. Frus- trated with doing menial tasks like alterations, he insisted on doing higher-level work, eventually becoming the youngest executive in the place. But he remained frustrated. He wanted to be his own man and make his own designs. He wanted to be a master tailor, not a factory manager. Eventually, he opened his own shop in midtown Manhattan, doing custom, or "bespoke" tailoring. This means not just "made-to-measure," where tailors modify standard patterns. This style of tailoring requires individual custom patterns for each customer, and several stages of fittings, each refining the fit and incorporating customer feedback. And so, the film returns Corvato to his shop, where we find him in pure ecstasy doing what he loves. Over the course of the film, we see him make a suit for one customer, from initial discussion and fitting through the final product. It is clear that Corvato loves people as much as his work, includ- ing his staff and his many regular customers. His vocation is to make people happy. Joe Centofani, although another Italian, comes to be a master tailor by a different circuitous route. Born in Philadelphia, he arrives in Italy at the age of four, growing up in Abruzzi, where his father was a tailor. He initially had no choice in his profession. "The first male born always followed the father's steps. That was automatic," he said in a 2008 inter- view. But in school, he also studied anatomy. "The study of science gave me the best idea of what true size and shape was," he said. In 1937, Centofani went to Ethiopia (recently come under Italian rule) and worked as a tailor with his father, malting uni- forms, until drafted into the Italian army in WWII. After the war, he was held in a British intemment camp in Kenya for 5 years, where he continued to make uniforms, this time for the British. He did not return to Italy until 1947, when he opened a tailor shop in Rome. Centofani tells this story with a smile, as he recounts how he was allowed to work as a tailor during his internment. Even as a prisoner, his profession brought him joy. In 1949, Centofani returned to the Philadelphia area, opening a shop first in Manayunk, and finally in Ardmore, PA, where he worked until he retired in 2010. Like Corvato, Centofani assembled a talented staff that included his daughter, Helen, a shirt-maker. Comprised of many nationalities, he compares them to the United Nations. "The lan- guage can be a little bit difficult, a barrier, but it's not. In tailor shop, we all understand each other without even taltdng." But his staff was aging with him and, like Cor- vato, Centofani also lamented what he saw as the passing of his profession. One Sunday, though, he found young Joe Genuardi peering through his shop window and invited him in. Genuardi had a sincere interest in becoming a bespoke tailor and, unlike other prospective apprentices, he knew nothing. He could not even thread a needle. Seeing 10, 2015 * 7:00pm- 9:20pm Mildred Remis Auditorium {Auditorium 161) Vicki Vasilopoulos (USA~Italy, 2013, 96 rain.) by Jeanne Brady someone he could truly teach (" a blank slate"), Centofani took him on as an apprentice. While the film follows Corvato making a suit for a regular customer, the focus on Centofani revolves partly about him training Genuardi, includ- ing a scene where he awards the young man a certificate proclaim- ing he is now a "first level custom tailor" in his own right after three years of apprenticeship. Daughter Helen and the rest of the shop staff proudly look on. Genuardi has become one of them. He made it. Checchino Fonticoli is the third master tailor featured. Although he worked for a brief time in Rome and has traveled the world extensively, servicing famous clients, Fonticoli never really left his hometown of Penne, Italy. L'kke Corvato and Centofani, he saw his hometown population of tailors dwindle from about fifteen to one or two. ("One," the lone tailor corrects him when he visits the last remaining shop. ~He's the last of the Mohicansl" laughs Fonticoli.) But unlike Corvato and Centofani, he had a more modern vision of his profession. He believed the future was in the factory. And it just so happened that a cousin founded the now famous Brioni factory in Penile, where he came to work. Now retired, he was working there still as a consultant when this film was made. As Fonticoli recalls, it was not a choice to become a tailor, but a directive from his father. Neverthe- less, he took to it. He reminisces about learning how men use a thimble, pushing from the side and not the end like women. He recalls fondly how he had to tie his thimble (middle) finger bent into position and sleep that way until it became natural. "You sleep for a week, always like that." He also remembers how he and the other appren- tices would sneak into the local church and pray to Sant' Omobono, patron saint of tailors, "Please help me to become a good tailor." He tried working as a custom tailor in Rome briefly, but at 20, he joined the factory staff. The environment suited his personality and his belief that the bespoke tailoring profession was simply not sustainable economi- calljz. After all, the lone tailor in Penne can make only four suits a week. Back in the U.S., Corvato is shown renewing a want ad for tailors. He is still relatively young by the profession's standards (late 60s), but his staff is much older. Centofanti jokes that a tailor never retires. But in reality, staffing is a major problem. Even with his apprentice, he cannot sustain his shop for much longer. Back in Penne, though, Brioni established a school for tailors. Boys, and now girls as well, are learning the industrial (fac- tory) tailor profession in significant numbers to feed the many factories in Italy that have appeared to fill the tailoring void. They do make beautiful suits, but unlike the bespoke tailors, these tailors do not wear their own suits to work. Their outfits are casual, their tools are modern, and each only performs one operation in the sequence of producing a suit. Managers and consultants like Fonticoli oversee the entire process like conducting an orchestra. These new tailors merely play one part in the work. Corvato says early on, "Those tools become a part of yourself. I don't want nobody to touch my tools!" In the factory, the tools are a part of the factory. In the end, Genuardi is shown moving to New York City and becoming part of a high-end factory operation. But he still has his own tools at home; he still creates his own designs. Corvato said, "You have to have the heart, and the feeling in your fin- gers." Genuardi appears to have both still, in spite of having to capitulate to the economic realities. In the end, there is still a love story. The screening will be followed by a discussion with five special guests: master tailor Alan Row leau of Alan Rouleau Couture on Newbury Street; Vicki Vasilopoulos, the film's director; Joe Caluatti, a retired master tailor who owned Rizzo Tailor in Harvard Square for 42 years; Lynne Blake, a pro- fessor of Fashion Design and chair of the Fashion Department at Lasell College; Carol Emanuelson, an assistant professor in the Fashion Design Program at Lasell College; and Michelle Finamore, Penny Vinik Curator of Fashion Arts, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.