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POST-GAZETTE, DECEMBER 4, 2015 PAGE 7 Mrs. Murphy... As I See It Christmas is upon us! Remember, re- _ tail neighborhood stores depend on community busi- ness during the holidays. Shop your neighborhood you may be surprised, they may have better prices than busy crowded malls! ... Recently, the racing commis- sioner awarded Racing Gates to Suffolk Downs and Brockton Fairgrounds in 2016. This ~11 be the first time that Brockton will be running since 2001 ... What a travesty of justice! A Revere girl, and captain of the cheerleaders at Revere Public High School, was recently booted off the cheerleading team for tweeting Revere had 90 percent illegals in the city. This, after someone tweeted why only 10 percent of people in Revere voted for Mayor. Maybe the teen was a little exag- gerated with her numbers but, according to reports, Revere's average on illegals is pretty high. However, Superintendent of School~ Diane Kelley having the cheerleading captain taken off the team was really stupid and irresponsible. Citizens of Revere are outraged!!! What happened to freedom of speech, and the First Amendment? This teen's family needs to get a good lawyer and sue the city for tak- ing away the girls right to speak! Another issue that stinks in this case is, the teen was working on a political school assignment on candidates running for presi- dent, and she decided to write about Donald Trump whom she said she liked! Of course that's taboo with the politically correct, liberal loony democrats[ Only in America can all this unrest be happening under Barack Hussein Obama!!] Enough said! ... Another huge topic! A large portion of citizens in this state do not want refugees from over- seas countries that they believe harbor terrorists coming in. Call Americans cold-hearted if you want, but THE MAJORITY do not want to live in fear! It appears Governor Charlie Bak- er stands with the people of Massachusetts ... Another surprising thing is, Muslim cler- ics in this country have yet to come out condemning the ter- rorists who bombed Paris, and that's worrisome to the American people! A Muslim woman went on FOX TV recently covered in the American flag from head to toe! What a dramatic display Of patriotism! The flag was defend- ing two mosque leaders now in jail proven to be terrorists! Another concern is women walk- ing in public places with their face completely covered! It's something they must do in their countries. But, they're in Amer- ica now, and with all the terror- ist's threats against the United States, complete face covering with just eyes showing needs to be banned here! In this coun- try only criminals cover their faces! ... If you're a fan of Hillary Clinton, I suggest you read a book about her and Bill called, The Clinton's War on Women. I assume the book must be factual or the Clinton's would be suing the authors. It de- picts Hillary as a vindictive, power hungry bitch. Read the book! Her campaign message is promising to fight for "Women's Rights." The only rights Hillary fights for are her own! ... Congratulations to disabled veteran Ken Umbro of Revere who was recently honored with an "Appreciation Award" from the Revere Veter- ans Organization for outstand- ing service to his country ... Till next time! LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Middlesex Probate and Family Court 208 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI15P6380EA Estate of JOSE ANTONIO SOUSA Date of Death Apdl 2, 2012 CITATION ON PETITION FOR FORMAL ADJUDICATION To all interested persons: A Petition for Formal Probate of Will with Appointment of Personal Represen- tative has been filed by Maria C. Sousa of Somerville, MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. The Petitioner requests that Maria C. Sousa of Somerville, MA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve With- out Surety on the bond in an unsupervised administration. IMPORTANT NOTICE You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on the return day of December 22, 2015. This is NOT a hearing date, but a dead- line by which you must file a written ap- pearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an affidavit of objections within thirty (30) days of the return day, action may be taken with- out further notice to you. UNSUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE MASSACHUSETTS UNIFORM PROBATE CODE (MUPC) A Personal Representative appointed under the MUPC in an unsupervised admin- istration is not required to file an inventory or annual accounts with the Court. Persons interested in the estate are entitled to notice regarding the administration directly from the Personal Representative and may peti- tion the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including the distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WlTNESS, HON.EDWARDF. DONNELLY,JR., First Justice of this Court. Date: November 24, 2015 Tara E. DeCristofaro, Register of Probate Run date: 12/4/15 Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Middlesex Probate and Family Court 208 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI15P6464EA Estate of CHARLES H. DIEHL Date of Death October 31, 2015 CITATION ON PETITION FOR FORMAL ADJUDICATION To all interested persons: A Petition for Formal Probate of Will with Appointment of Personal Representa- tive has been filed by Chris E. Johanson of Somerville, MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. The Petitioner requests that Chris E. Johanson of Somerville, MA be appointed as Personal Representative(e) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond in an unsu- pervised administration. IMPORTANT NOTICE You have the dght to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on the return day of January 20, 2016. This is NOT a hearing date, but a dead- line by which you must file a written appearanceand objection if you objecttothis proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an affidavit of objections within thirty (30) days of the return day, action may he taken with- out further notice to you. UNSUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE MASSACHUSETTS UNIFORM PROBATE CODE (MUPC) A Personal Representative appointed under the MUPC in an unsupervised admin- istration is not required to file an inventory or annual accounts with the Court. Persons interested in the estate are entitled to notice regarding the administration directly from the Personal Representative and may peti- tion the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including the distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, HON. EDWARD F. DONNELLY, JR., First Justice of this Court. Date: November 25, 2015 Tara E. DeCristofaro, Register of Probate Run date: 12/4/15 THOUGHTS BY DAN ABOUT THIS with Daniel A. DiCenso MOHAMMAD REZA PAHLAVI (October 26, 1919, Tehran, Persia-July 27, 1980, Cairo, Egypt): A Tragedy of Good Intentions The Shah early in his rule. Revolutions usually bring their share of problems and -are never easy, but the Ira- nian Revolution of 1979 was a tragedy even by revolutionary standards. At the time of the revolt, Iran was going through an unprecedented period of social and economic growth all thanks to one man, the last Shah, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi] Of course, the reasons for the Iranian Revolution were numer- ous and complicated and the Shah himself is something of a paradox-- a liberal who pushed for a secular Iran with Western attitudes who was hated by the fundamentalists of his country, the driving force of the revolu- tion, and many liberals in the Western world. Similarly, an evaluation of his legacy depends largely on who you ask. Most of the Iranians who fled the coun- try after the revolution (the '80s proved to be one of the heydays for Iranian immigration) lament the overthrowing of the Shah (if not necessarily., the abolishment of the monarchy} and have very few good things to say about Ayatollah Khomeini, the new supreme leader. It's hard to guess what the Iranians who remained in the country truly believe, as fear controls much of what they say. But even here, evidence points to mixed emo- tions, as we will soon see. The Shah was labeled with many of the same stigmas as Latin American dictators, mostly a puppet of Western gov- ernments. Indeed, the United States put him in power after the overthrow of the demo- cratically elected Prime Minister Mohammad Mossaddegh in a 1953 coup to prevent the na- tionalization of oil in Iran. Both the United States and Great Britain got involved to be sure their oil interests in Iran would not be compromised. Operation Ajax, led by Kermit Roosevelt, Jr., resulted in deposing Mos- saddegh and replacing him with Pahlavi's appointee, General Fazlollah Zahedi. The U.S. intervention was understandably iU-received and soured relations with Iran. As Madeleine Albright would write years later, "In 1953, the United States played a significant role in orchestrating the overthrow of Iran's popular Prime Minister, Mohammad Mossaddegh. The Eisenhower Administration believed its actions were justi- fied for strategic reasons; but the coup was clearly a setback for Iran's political development. And it is easy to see now why many Iranians continue to re- sent this intervention by Amer- ica in their internal affairs." It's not hard to understand, then, why Iranians saw the Shah as a Western puppet and mistrusted everything he did. A case could be made, in fact, that a lot of the advancements he brought, while still upsetting to the fundamentalist sect, would have been better received had there not been Western influ- ence in his legacy. As such, his push for Westernization seemed suspiciously like catering to his international benefactors. However, if this was the real problem the Shah's detractors had with their monarch, it was short-sighted at best. That's the real tragedy, for the Shah, like his father (Reza Shah Pahlavi) before him, was doing a lot of great things for Iran, pulling the country in the right direc- tion. Had there been a little more support for the Shah as trouble began brewing before the revolution, it's possible that Iran could have caught up to a lot of the Western powers it favored in economics and hu- man rights. One needs only to look at the human abuses since the Ayatollah to see how far Iran has fallen in the 35 or so years since the fall of the monarchy. Not that the reign of the Shah was an exemplary model of de- mocracy. He had little patience for dissenters, and those who used the press against him were often imprisoned. He banned the Communist Tudeh Party, which was facing intemationai scrutiny in the midst of the Cold War. But look at all he ac- complished. Given how much we take for granted in the free world, it may sound like a mere expectation that he gave women the right to vote, but this im- provement in women's circum- stances was actually started by the king's father and extended now to include the end of forced marriages, child marriages, and polygamy. Additionally, under his secular Westernized govem- ment, women were no longer required to conceal their faces. After the Shah ended segrega- tion of education, women found doors open in the previously out-of-reach fields of science, law, and medicine. The biggest step forward was that women were able to obtain government positions, and many took this chance, such as Farrokhroo Parsa, who became a minister and Shidm Ebadi, who became a judge. The Shah was moving quickly toward a secularized country free of gender discrimination. Perhaps too quickly, before a country with a significant cleri- cal demographic (mostly Shi'a) was ready to embrace such changes, even ff they were mov- ing Iran toward a modernized, economically stable nation. Maybe it was seen as intrusive Western interference. Be that as it may, the beginning of the end for the Shah (and the mon- archy by extension) was when the working-class joined forces with the religious sect due to the sharp division between the rich and the poor in Iran. When the image of the Shah as a symbol of decadence was combined with the image of the Shah as a Western revolutionary, the seeds for a violent revolt were planted. Sometimes lessons are learned too late, and it took a revolution for Iranians to realize how much better life was un- der the Shah than the Islamic Republic of Iran. The new modern-minded leader of Iran. At first the dichotomy of opinion seemed divided amongst the Iranians who fled the coun- try in the '80s' and those who remained. But, as I've learned from spealdng to many Iranians who still live in the country, the lines are not as clear cut. One young Iranian tourist I spoke to told me that both the Shah and his father were still held in high esteem in Iran, and support for his reign was widespread from all who were not connected with the govern- ment. A friend of mine, who came to America in 1985 as a twelve-year-old boy, spoke to me a great deal about life in Iran after the Shah. "I had to escape on a camel," he told me. He blamed U.S. Intervention early in his reign for the Shah's poor later recep- tion, but concedes that another equally damning aspect of his reputation was the stark in- equality between the rich and the poor majority who lived in slums. "But the Shah was try- ing to help them, too," my friend said. "He was planning to build better housing for them." The Shah died of kidney failure in 1980 while exiled in Egypt. He missed his vindica- tion as the younger generations in his country, growing up in the digital age which has brought global influence to their doorstep faster than their parents could ever imagine, are starting to regard his legacy in a brighter fight. A 32-year-old woman living in Tehran who was interviewed by PBS said, "I think people, particularly our parents, were very unfair to Shah. He was not a bad man at all. Even worse! Look at these guys who rule the country now -- compared to them he was a saint!" Lilcewise, Golam Hossein, a twenty-something making a living as a cab driver in Iran, said, "God rest his soul in peace, these people did not deserve him. Those days, people were free. My dad bought a Paykan for 24,000 tomans. Those days, Iranians could go anywhere in the world. There was no infla- tion. He treated them decently. Now, look at people lining up for a piece of chicken. Under the Shah, if you wanted to drink or to go to a place to dance, you would have done so; and if you wanted to go to a mosque and to pray, you would have done so without anyone judging you. Today, everything is out of its place." Despite undeniable corrup- tion during the Shah's rule, especially toward dissenters, it has gotten worse. Ahmad Reza, (Continued on Page 13)