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December 4, 2015     Post-Gazette
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--! POST-GAZETTE, DECEMBER 4, 2015 PAGE 13 by John Christoforo A Nostalgic Remembrance f'atltl61 abb'o onno Babbononno was always talk- ing about his paesani. Most of them were people who had be- friended him when he first ar- rived in Boston before the turn of the twentieth century. When I came along, Babbononno was in his 60s and, as they retired, him and his friends would get together at storefront social clubs, play cards, swap stories about making wine, brag about the accomplishments of their sons, and talk about family life in general. A generation later, Dad and my uncles did the same thing, only there was more of an American slant on things. They belonged to or- ganizations like trade unions, the Sons of Italy, the Knights of Columbus, American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars and an assortment of athletic social clubs. In the case of my family, it was the musicians' union and the activities that corresponded to membership. With my generation, it was a bit different. We were the sons of Americans and broke away from the strictly Italian. lifestyles that helped the first and second generation sur- vive. In my case, the people I've networked with over the years have varied. During the last 20 years, I've been involved with the Sons of Italy, the First Corps of Cadets, the Boston Musicians' Association, the Pirandello Lyceum, and Italian Heritage Month committee, just to mention a few. In terms of alumni associations, I've always been there for English High School. Over the years, I would hap- pen to run into a few friends from my college days and we would talk about old times. When I started my freshmen year at Boston State College in the fall of 1956, there were about 42 of us who were part of that entering class. After the first year, almost half had dropped out. By the time our junior year began, there were 21 of us and that is the num- ber that graduated together in 1960, 55 years ago. At times, Ray Civili, Bob Dicey and Ed Donnelly, (three of the crowd) and I would happen to meet and discuss getting all of the guys together, but no one ever had the time to get things off the ground. Five years ago, two of my former classmates, Bob Pesce and Frank LaBollita, took the initiative and put together a reunion. Both had retired from public school departments and, with a little time on their hands, began the task of locating their fellow classmates. Through their investigations, they dis- covered that 4 or 5 of the 21 had passed away. I knew about one of them, as he was a teacher in the Boston Public Schools. I believe I even attended his wake. Anyway, that left 16 or 17 of us to locate. Frank and Bob found everyone except Ed Don- nelly, and when I became aware of this, I made a few phone calls and found him. He, too, worked in the Boston Schools and I lucked out. With the list now intact, Frank and Bob contacted everyone regarding a dinner that Frank arranged at Hanscom Air Base on a Fri- day evening and we were set to go. Out of the 17, a dozen of us showed up: Paul Ciccarelli, Ray Civili, Romano DePaoli, Bob Dicey, Ed Donnelly, Ed's wife, Audrey, Paul Hogan, John Hurley, Frank Kennedy, Bob Pesce, Paul Riley and yours truly. The rest, for whatever reasons, couldn't make it. Since then, Bob Pesce has moved to the west coast to be near his children and Romano DePaoli passed away. Heading back to our days at Boston State, we were divided into two groups: those of us right out of high school and those just out of the military. We were 17 or 18 and the vets were in their mid-to-late 20s. We were worlds apart and gravi- tated to our own age groups with a couple of exceptions. My crowd of youngsters included Paul Ciccarelli, Bob Pesce, Bob Dicey, John Hurley, Frank LaBollita, Paul Riley and one veteran, Ray Civili. We social- ized together, double dated, became friendly with each other's families and developed a loosely configured brotherhood, working together when we had our shop classes and studying together when it was exam time. At a point in our senior year, I decided to throw a beatnik party. I was dating a young lady from Winthrop and the playroom in the basement of her home was to be the location. The party was a success, but over the years I had forgotten about it. At the get together, one of the guys had pictures of all of us, dressed in beatnik costumes of the 1950s. One of the guys reminded me of the fact that as we grew beards and mustaches for the event, we were criticized by the adminis- tration at the college for looking so radical. They relented when the explanation was given, but we were also told to shave after the event. That's how conserva- tive it was back then ... we had to conform, or else! When I was shown the pic- tures of that party, I reminisced about the good times we had and how young and thin we looked. Actually ,we were young -- FOR YOU WHO APPRECIATE THE FINEST -- THE MUSIC FOR ALL OCCASIONS 781-648-5678 and that was the best part of it. Well, after a cocktail or two and a bit of reminiscing, we sat down to dinner. With us young- sters now in our 70s and the vets in their early 80s, the gap we experienced during our col- lege years was long gone. When dinner ended, Frank LaBollita took over as master of cererdo- nies and asked each of us to talk about our careers and our personal lives. It was fascinat- ing to hear each person give us his history. Some of the older guys were married when we started college and most of the younger ones married soon af- ter graduation. I enjoyed hear- ing about their families and their children, some of them already hitting their mid-50s. Seeing what our educational backgrounds were, most of the guys taught shop to begin with and later branched into other areas of education. Some left teaching completely and went into business and, thankfully, all did rather well in life. I was the last one on the agenda to speak. I had writ- ten the class will 55 years earlier and they wanted me to resurrect it and read it again. Before I did the reading, I spoke about the directions my life had taken. I discovered that I was the last of the class to get married. I was still single until I was 38 years old, and being a musician, actor, businessman, teacher and writer, my story was a lot different than most of them. The get-together ended just before 9:00 pro, and most of the guys headed home. A few stayed at the air base, sip- ping after-dinner drinks and continuing to reminisce about the old days. As I've said many times, the best thing about the old days is that we were young, and that's one of the things we can't bring back. We parted company at about 10:00 pm and I drove home with a smile on my face. I thought about the many family get- togethers I've experienced in my lifetime and how Nanna, Babbononno and my folks talked about relatives and pae- sani they hadn't seen in years ... how some looked the same and how some had aged. When I returned home, I had to tell Loretta all about my night with my old classmates. I related the stories I heard and told her how some hadn't changed and how old some of them had got- ten. When I finished, I said to myself, "You've become Nanna, Babbononno, Morn and Dad all roiled into one." I guess that's not so bad. GOD BLESS AMERICA I DIAMONDS 1 FIOLEX ESTATE JEWELRY Bought & Sold Jewelers Exch. Bldg. Jim (617) 263-7766 Small Ads For more information, call 617-227-8929. This and That (Continued from Page 7) 'a lawyer, concurred, explain- ing, "And yet they would tell us that during the Shah and in a secular system it was impos- sible to bribe a judge. Today it is hard to find a judge who will not demand a bribe!" Hamid Reza, however, while defending the Shah to an ex- tent, does hold him to blame for turning a blind eye to the mounting tension until it was too late and a revolution ex- ploded. "It is true that there was no love lost between him and Iranian intellectuals," he said. "And the intellectuals did much to vilify the Shah's im-The Shah in his last few years age among the youth and the as ruler. masses. But the Shah could have responded by reaching out 1981 and 1985. The prison to the massesd system was centralized and There was much to attack drastically expanded. Prison the Shah on. He allowed his life was drastically worse wealth to blind him to the under the Islamic Republic overwhelming poverty and than under the Pahlavis. One create a false sense of security who survived both writes that against political unrest. He four months under warden suppressed free speech and Asadollah Lajevardi took the was harsh toward dissenters, toll of four years under SAVAK. But the best summation of In the prison literature of the his legacy was spoken by Pahlavi era, the recurring political historian Ervand words had been "boredom" Abrahamian: "Whereas less and "monotony.~ In that of than 100 political prisoners the Islamic Republic, they had been executed between were "fear," "death," "terror," 1971 and 1979, more than "horror," and most frequent of 7900 were executed between all "nightmare." 500 Canterbury Street The Req ectfid Way. Boston, MA 02131 617.524.1036 Serving the Italian Community www.stmichaelcemetery.com for Over I O0 Years! LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Middlesex Probate and Family Court 208 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI15P6451EA Estate of JOHN THOMAS BRADY Also Known As J. THOMAS BRADY Date of Death August 30, 2015 CITATION ON PETITION FOR FORMAL ADJUDICATION To all interested persons: A Petition for Formal Probate of Will with Appointment of Personal Represen- tative has been filed by John Mandile of" Winchester, MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. The Petitioner requests that John Mandile of Winchester, MA be appointed as Per- sonal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond in an unsupervised administration. IMPORTANT NOTICE You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on the return day of December 23, 2015. This is NOT a hearing date, but a dead- line by which you must file a wdtten ap- pearance and objection if you object to this proceadin,q. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an affidavit of ol~tions within thirty (30) days of the return dW, action may be taken with- out further n~ico to you. UNSUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE MASSACHUSEI"rs UNIFORM PROBATE CODE (MUPC) A Personal Representative appointed under the MUPC in an unsupervised admin- iatration is not required to file an inventory or annual accounts with the Court. Persons interested in the estate are entitled to notice regarding the administration directly from the Personal Representative and may peti- tion the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including the distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, HON. EDWARDF.DONNELLY,JR., First Justice of this Court. Date: November 25, 2015 Tara E. DeCristofaro, Register of Probate Run date: 12/4/15 Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Middlesex Probate and Family Court 208 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI15P5455EA Estate of RICHARD MICHAEL GLASBERG Also Known As RICHARD GLASBERG Date of Death September 18, 2015 CITATION ON PETITION FOR FORMAL ADJUDICATION To all interested persons: A Petition for Formal Probate of Will with Appointment of Personal Representative has been filed by Samantha Marie Glasberg of Austin, TX requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. The Petitioner requests that Samantha Marie Glasberg of Austin, TX be app~nted as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond in an unsupervised administration. IMPORTANT NOTICE You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on the return day of December 23, 2015. This is NOT a hearing date, but a dead- line by which you must file a written ap- pearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an affidavit of objections within thirty (30) days of the return day, action may be taken with- out further notice to you. UNSUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE MASSACHUSET'rS UNIFORM PROBATE CODE (MUPC) A Personal Representative appointed under the MUPC in an unsupervised admin- istration is not required to file an inventory or annual accounts with the Court. Persons interested in the estate are entitled to notice regarding the administration directly from the Personal Representative and may peti- tion the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including the distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, HON. EDWARD F. DONNELLY, JR., First Justice of this Court. .Date: November 25, 2015 Tara E. DeCristofaro, Register of Probate Run date: 12/4/15