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POST-GAZETTE, DECEMBER 12, 2014 Page 13 Fanna Babb onno by John Christoforo A Nostalgic Remembrance Each year at about this time, Dad would say to me, "What the heck am I going to get your mother for Christmas?" Mom was fussy. She never liked fur coats or really fancy clothes, but she did like jewelry. Uncle Nick was the guy to talk to about jewelry as he had several contacts in the business. How this came about was due to the GI Bill that he took advantage of. As WWII came to an end, Uncle Nick was discharged from the Navy and decided to use the Bill to get himself an education. He had heard that the North Bennet Street School in the North End, the oldest trade school in the country, had courses on watch making and watch repair. Once trained, he made several contacts in the jewelry business, but never spent more than spare time in it as he ran for office in the Musicians' Union and became the vice president, a position he would hold for about 25 years. When Dad and I ap- proached him about both of us buying jewelry for Mom for Christmas, he brought us to 333 Washington Street, the best known Jewelry Exchange in Boston at that time. Daniel Seidler was the company he was involved with and introduced us to Jack and Fred Seidler, the sons of the name on the door. Fred waited on us with enthusiasm as he was a close friend of Uncle Nick's and had assured him that anyone in his family would receive a good discount if they purchased jewelry or silverware from him. We discussed Mom's taste with Fred Seidler and the tail-end of the conversation revealed to us that Mom didn't have a charm brace- let, something that was very popular back in the day. Dad and I looked over several designs and decided on one that was rather nice. Dad added the first charm to the bracelet and I picked out a second charn that would be my present to my mother. Uncle Nick then picked out the third one and told us that it would be his and Aunt Dorothy's present to my mother. The price was at a whole- sale level, as Fred Seidler cut the profit down to a mini- mum. We were happy and the card that was added into the box explained every- thing. The one thing I didn't mention was that all of the charms were copies of mu- sical instruments. Mom was the daughter of a musician (Babbononno), the sister of two musicians (Uncles Paul and Nick), the wife of a musician (my Dad), and the mother of a fledgling musi- cian (me). We thought that, considering the circum- stance, she would like a charm bracelet with musi- cal instruments dangling from it. We were right, and it would give us good cause to add instruments when her birthday rolled around. After the present was wrapped, Fred Seidler en- gaged me in conversation as he was curious about his friend Nick's nephew-God- son. Fred was a short, round, well-dressed man with a con- stant Smile on his face. His end of the conversation was mainly questions as to my status in life. I told him that I was a freshman in college, worked in a movie theater, studied music from family members and was going to be a bass player like my father, and that I played baseball in the spring and summer. Before the conver- sation ended, Fred Seidler gave me an offer that seemed to fit fight into my schedule. He asked, "How would you like to fill your briefcase with jewelry and sell what you have on campus. You could take the stuff on con- signment with knowledge of the prices I will charge you. You can add on whatever you want as your commission, let's say, and we will all make a little money." As I thought about it, what came to mind was the amount of students I ran into at Bos- ton State that asked me for the time or for a light when we were on a break in the smoking lounge. I told Fred that I would like to start out with a variety of lighters and inexpensive watches for both men and women. Most of what they sold at Seidler's was high-end, but they did have several brands of imported watches that were inexpensive and a good array of lighters including a new type that was electronic. Fred priced each item that I picked and told me how much to add on for a profit and still keep the prices lower than retail stores. He then found an old jewelry case and placed all of the items in it, roughly 20 watches, 10 men's and 10 women's, and about the same number of lighters. He added in two identical watches, one made out of stainless steel and the other gold plated. They were as thin as a silver dollar, which back in the day indicated an expensive time piece. He then said, "You wear these, alternating each day. One picture is worth a thousand words." He then had a lighter engraved with my initials on it and told me to use it only when I lit someone's cigarette. When I asked what I owed for my two new watches and the lighter, his answer was "Not much, but I'll let you know later." When I was back on cam- pus, I wore the watches and carried my monogrammed lighter. When my fellow stu- dents commented, I showed them what was in my brief- case. Before that week was over, I had sold everything I had, wholesale, but returned home with a pretty good profit. This new venture would continue throughout my college career and I everl thought about going into the jewelry business when I graduated. Back at the Seville Theater, by that Christmas, every usher and candy girl had a new watch or a lighter. Some even bought their parents, sib- lings or significant others their presents from me. A year or so later, after I be- came a professional musi- cian, I began taking a brief- case filled with watches and lighters to the jobs I played, just in case the other musi- cians might have needs or wants. As time went on, Fred Seidler's health headed down hill and he wasn't at the helm of his business more than a couple of days per week. His brother, Jack, passed away suddenly and their sons and sons-in-law took over. They were not as friendly as Freddy had been and sort of resented me be- ing involved in the business. As a result, I would call and ask for Fred. If he was in, I would speak to him and dis- cuss my needs. He would put things together and I would pick them up on that same day while he was there. No one was going to go against him when he was there and things worked out for me to my liking. After graduation three years later, something had to go. I began teaching, playing music at night and continued working at the Seville Theater whenever I could fit it in. The first thing to go was the jewelry busi- ness, and after ten years, the job at the Seville. As a young adult, I narrowed things down to teaching in Boston and playing music at night. I would con- tinue with both careers and add in several other aspects of show business for the next few decades of my life. That Christmas, when Morn saw the charm brace- let, she fell in love with it. From that point on, both Dad and I would add a new musi- cal instrument to it each time a gift was due: Christ- mas or Mom's birthday. By the time the bracelet was filled with charms, it looked like a symphony or swing orchestra had exploded in miniature. Mom loved it and wore it with pride. After all it was from her husband and her only son. GOD BLESS AMERICA News Briefs (Continued CIA Exposed by U.S. Sen. Diane Feinstein Headlines galore, the CIA tortured te:r)rists who live to kill us. Waterboarding and enhanced interrogation techniques are un-American The U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee will release to the public all the evil we com- mitted in the name of sur- vival. Moonbats think this stuff should be exposed. Oh yah, I forget, didn't we have this debate back dur- ing President Bush's second term when we stopped waterboarding. What good is there in releasing this old information worldwide if it only emboldens our enemies out there bent on our destruction? Politicians at home want to stay clean wearing pris- tine white gloves while the sometimes dirty work is done by CIA operatives in order for others to have their clean white gloves. Call it necessary evils; call it what- ever you wish, but no good will come to us by airing our dirty laundry to our enemies They Must Speak Fluent Dog, Huh While watching MSNBC the other night, I was amazed how fluent all those talking like Rev. Al Sharp- ton speak fluent dog. Yup, they do all fight. Know what I mean? They all bark loudly but never say a coherent word. They are all bark and no bite. Black Caucus Questions Tribe Status The Congressional Black Caucus are reportedly urg- ing the Obama Administra- tion to withhold federal rec- ognition of a Native Ameri- can tribe pending investiga- tion into its history of be- ing anti-Black. The Interior Department is ready to rec- ognize the Panunkey Tribe in Virginia and would make it eligible for special benefits and allow them to pursue a casino. A decision is due by March 30th. Quote to Note "Civilizations increase their greatness when their LEGAL NOTICE from Page I) citizens plant trees whose shade they will never enjoy." -- Ancient proverb Local Moonbats Join National Protest Wasn't it nice to see resi- dents of both Lexington and Newton protesting two re- cent grand jury decisions. Holding a protest in silence inside a church to address the extinguished voices of the slain. Lately, all we have been seeing is mob rule roaming the streets of America when what we need are real leaders out there seeking real solutions and communication. Mobs take over when a country goes leaderless. Ironically, watching moon- bats in Lexington and New- ton talk about social justice makes me want to barf. It is easy for liberals in "lily- white Peoples Republics" talking about racial justice and inclusion, isn't it? Do You Know the Way Outta San Jose? Over in San Jose, Califor- nia, the West Coast moonbats have apparently had it up to here over the homeless mov- ing into the streets of San Jose. Recently, the powers that be at City Hall sent the cops in to clear out a shantytown called "The Jungle: where some 200 homeless folks have been camped out for some time. They were warned the a SWAT Team was coming and they came. Folks fled with the clothes on their backs to avoid arrest. The "Jungle" is now history as are the home- less of San Jose. Forget that old tune, the new tune is "Don you know the way outta San Jose?" Tough luck for the homeless. Maybe they should try Beverly Hills next? I love seeing moonbats turn into the hypocrites that they are. Landrieu Goes Down, Down, Down The Republican Landslide back on Election Day on No- vember 4th just got a bit big- ger when Republican Bill Cassidy beat three-term in- cumbent U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, D-LA by 56 per- cent to 44 percent in the December 6th run-off. Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Middlesex Division 208 Cambridge Street East Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI14P6252EA Estate of PAUL VINCENT FLYNN Also Known As PAUL V. FLYNN, SR. Date of Death October 23, 2014 INFORMAL PROBATE PUBLICATION NOTICE To all persons interested in the above captioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner ~mothy J. Rynn of Watertown, MA a Will has been admitted to informal probate. Timothy J. Flynn of Watertown, MA has been informally appointed as the Personal Representative of the estate to serve without surety on the bond. The estate is being administered under informal procedure by the Personal Represen- tative under the Massachusetts Uniform Pro- bate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but interested parties are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. Interested parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute formal proceedings and to obtain orders terminating or restricting the powers of Personal Representatives appointed under informal procedure. A copy of the Petition and Will, if any, can be obtained from the Petitioner. Run date: 12/12/14 LEGAL NOTICE Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Middlesex Division 208 Cambridge Street East Cambridge, MA 02141 (617) 768-5800 Docket No. MI14P6340EA Estate of JANE L. McKENNEY Date of Death November 3, 2014 INFORMAL PROBATE PUBLICATION NOTICE To all persons interested in the above captioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner Alison J. Jones of Wsotford, MA. Alison J. Jones of Weatford, MA has been informally appointed as the Personal Repre- sentative of the estate to serve without surety on the bond. The estate is being administered under informal procedure by the Personal Represen- tative under the Massachusetts Uniform Pro- bate Code without supervision by the Court. inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but interested parties are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Persona[ Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration, interested parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute formal proceedings and to obtain orders terminating or restricting the powers of Personal Representatives appointed under informal procedure. A copy of the Petition and Wi,, if any, can be obtained from the Petitioner. Run date: 12/12/14